Oct 14, 2019  
2018-2019 Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
2018-2019 Catalog and Student Handbook [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


In addition to the credit courses of study in each of the following disciplines, the college also offers from semester to semester various special courses of study not listed. These courses are offered through the office of Community Education and all inquiries should be addressed to the dean of that office.

Courses with (T) designation will transfer to some four year colleges and universities. Courses with (NIT) designation are not specifically designed to transfer to senior institutions.  Please see transfer equivalency tables, the Walters State Student Success Center or your faculty advisor for more specifics on the transferability of coursework.

Course Designations

F - course offered Fall Semester

S - course offered Spring Semester

Su - course offered Summer Semester

As needed - offered on student need

 
  
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    CULA 1320 - Culinary I - Fundamentals

    3 credit(s)

    This is the introductory food production class for culinary students. Topics include the theories and methods of cooking, vocabulary, and the development of safe and sanitary kitchen practices. Production items will include vegetable and starch preparation, stocks, sauces and soups, poultry and egg cookery. Prerequisite(s): CULA 1200. F, S. (T)
    1 hour lecture/4.5 hours laboratory
  
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    CULA 1321 - Advanced Baking and Pastry Skills

    3 credit(s)

    Bakery Skills are polished as students learn more difficult baking, pastry and dessert techniques. The production of high skill, high quality finished products are emphasized with special attention to chocolate work, plate presentation, cold and hot preparations and appearance. Soufflés, dessert sauces, flavorful and creative designs exemplify this course. Prerequisite(s): CULA 1200 , CULA 1310. F, S. (T)
    1 hour lecture/4.5 hours laboratory
  
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    CULA 1325 - Culinary II - Fabrication

    3 credit(s)

    This course will introduce the principles of identifying, receiving, fabricating and storing vegetables, fruits, herbs, nuts, grains, dry goods, prepared goods, dairy products, spices. Students will then explore the subject of meats, poultry, seafood and their application in foodservice operations. Prerequisite(s): CULA 1320. F, S. (T)
    1 hour lecture/4.5 hours laboratory
  
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    CULA 1330 - Garde Manger

    3 credit(s)

    This course provides students with skills and knowledge of the organization, equipment and responsibilities of the “cold kitchen”. Students are introduced to and prepare cold hors d’oeuvres, sandwiches, salads, as well as basic charcuterie items while focusing on the total utilization of the product. Reception foods and buffet arrangements are introduced. Prerequisite(s): CULA 1325. S. (T)
    1 hour lecture/4.5 hours laboratory
  
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    CULA 2180, 2280, 2380 - Culinary Internship

    1, 2, or 3 credit(s)

    This course is a supervised work experience in the culinary field requiring a minimum number of work hours. Work activities can range from entry-level to professional cooking. Individual conference with the intern director are arranged instead of class attendance. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and permission of Internship Director required. F, S, Su. (NIT)
  
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    CULA 2320 - Quantity Foods

    3 credit(s)

    This course is designed to build knowledge and experience in quantity food production in a foodservice operation. Basic principles of foodservice management and their application to volume food production, menu development, food safety, procurement, kitchen equipment, customer service, marketing, and finance will be covered during the semester. Prerequisite(s): CULA 1325, CULA 1330. S. (T)
    1 hour lecture/4.5 hours laboratory
  
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    CULA 2331 - Cooking for Special Diets

    3 credit(s)

    This course introduces students to the basics of product selection and cooking techniques appropriate for a variety of special needs or food allergy diets. Food preparation and planning menus for food allergies, food intolerances and diabetic cooking methods and ingredient choices and/or substitutions are taught in this class. Prerequisite(s): CULA 1325. S. (T)
    1 hour lecture/4.5 hours laboratory
  
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    CULA 2341 - Artisan and Specialty Breads

    3 credit(s)

    This course provides an advanced study in the art of bread making. Topics include relevant formulas and techniques associated with naturally leavened loaves, hearth breads, focaccia, flat breads, quick breads and other breads utilizing a variety of grains. The student will be taught the steps to produce artisan and specialty breads that meet or exceed the expectations of the customer. Prerequisite(s): CULA 1310. F, S-as needed. (T)
    1 hour lecture/4.5 hours laboratory
  
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    CULA 2342 - European Cakes and Tortes

    3 credit(s)

    The course will introduce the student to a wide variety of classical and modern cakes suitable for restaurant, retail shops and large-scale production. Emphasis is placed on advanced techniques of mixing, filling, glazing and icing. In this course students will prepare a variety of cakes/tortes, including Dobos, Sacher, and Linzer tortes and Black Forest cake. Prerequisite(s): CULA 1321. F, S-as needed. (T)
    1 hour lecture/4.5 hours laboratory
  
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    CULA 2350 - Professional Catering

    3 credit(s)

    This course examines the requirements to start and operate a catering company. Topics of discussion include kitchen equipment, regulations, operations and business planning. Prerequisite(s): CULA 1325, CULA 1330 F. (T)
    1 hour lecture/4.5 hours laboratory
  
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    CULA 2351 - Plated Desserts and Presentations

    3 credit(s)

    The essential elements of plated desserts are taught in detail. The students are taught to strive for a well-balanced presentation. The course emphasizes the importance of the required time and patience for yielding breathtaking results. Students are exposed to methods of production that result in dramatic presentations in quantity. Prerequisite(s): CULA 1321. F. (T)
    1 hour lecture/4.5 hours laboratory
  
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    CULA 2352 - Hot and Cold Desserts

    3 credit(s)

    This course covers the principles and techniques of sorbets and ice creams, soufflés, cobblers, crisps and strudel dough products. Topics include baked Alaska, bombes, sherbets, crepes, and hot and cold soufflés. Students will prepare hot and cold desserts with suitable sauces and garnishes. Prerequisite(s): CULA 1321. S. (T)
    1 hour lecture/4.5 hours laboratory
  
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    CULA 2361 - Retail Bakery Management

    3 credit(s)

    This course introduces the student to the application of baking and pastry arts production techniques in a wholesale and/or retail setting. Students are introduced to the theory of merchandising baked goods for bakeries as well as formula standardization and conversion, production planning, purchasing, costing and “price for profit”. Students will hone their skills, learn new formulas and create desserts while practicing techniques, methods and procedures used to develop consistent quality products. This is the capstone class for the AAS degree in Baking and Pastry. Prerequisite(s): CULA 1321, CULA 2341, CULA 1232. F, S-as needed. (T)
    6 hours laboratory
  
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    CULA 2363 - Bistro

    3 credit(s)

    Students will gain experience in a production environment, preparing daily meals for a bistro. The primary focus is on speed, quantity production, quality out-put, and teamwork. Students will rotate responsibilities within the kitchen and dining room. Menu planning, ingredient requisitioning, and production cost will be required in weekly meal preparation. Students will also perform menu forecasting to track sales and improve bistro offerings and cost savings. This is the capstone class for AAS Culinary degree in Hot Foods. Prerequisite(s): CULA 1325, CULA 1330 , CULA 2376 . F, S. (T)
    6 hours laboratory
  
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    CULA 2375 - Purchasing and Cost Control

    3 credit(s)

    This course is intended to provide student with the methodologies and tools to control food, beverage, labor and other cost within a hospitality business. Hospitality principles are also explored. This course regularly uses basic mathematics. S, Su-as needed. (T)
  
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    CULA 2376 - International Foods

    3 credit(s)

    International Foods will expose students to some of the diversity of culture and foods of many countries around the world including regions of the United States. Classroom assignments cooking demonstrations, guest speakers, and cooking labs will allow students to have a taste of the world. Prerequisite(s): CULA 1325. F. (T)
    1 hour lecture/4.5 hours laboratory
  
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    DANC 1005 - Introduction to Dance

    3 credit(s)

    A survey of dance from primitive to the present with emphasis on understanding and appreciating the physical and aesthetical nature of the art form. As needed. (T)
  
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    DANC 1530 - Ballet I

    2 credit(s)

    Instruction and practice in elementary classical ballet techniques. May be repeated for a maximum of four (4) credit hours. As needed. (T) Equivalent to PHED 1530
  
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    DANC 1535 - Ballet II

    2 credit(s)

    Instruction and practice in intermediate classical ballet techniques. May be repeated for a maximum of four (4) credit hours. As needed. (T) Equivalent to PHED 1535
  
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    DANC 1540 - Jazz 1

    2 credit(s)

    Instruction and practice in elementary classical jazz techniques. May be repeated for a maximum of four (4) credit hours. As needed. (T) Equivalent to PHED 1540
  
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    DANC 1545 - Jazz II

    2 credit(s)

    Instruction and practice in intermediate classical jazz techniques. May be repeated for a maximum of four (4) credit hours. As needed. (T) Equivalent to PHED 1545
  
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    DANC 1550 - Modern Dance I

    2 credit(s)

    Instruction and practice in elementary classical modern dance techniques. May be repeated for a maximum of four (4) credit hours. As needed. (T) Equivalent to PHED 1550
  
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    DANC 1555 - Modern Dance II

    2 credit(s)

    Instruction and practice in intermediate classical modern dance techniques. May be repeated for a maximum of four (4) credit hours. As needed. (T) Equivalent to PHED 1555
  
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    DANC 1560 - Tap Dance I

    2 credit(s)

    Instruction and practice in elementary classical tap dance techniques. May be repeated for a maximum of four (4) credit hours. As needed. (T) Equivalent to PHED 1560
  
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    DANC 1565 - Tap Dance II

    2 credit(s)

    Instruction and practice in intermediate classical tap dance techniques. May be repeated for a maximum of four (4) credit hours. As needed. (T) Equivalent to PHED 1565
  
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    DANC 1570 - Clogging

    2 credit(s)

    Instruction and practice in elementary classical clogging techniques. May be repeated for a maximum of four (4) credit hours. As needed. (T) Equivalent to PHED 1570
  
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    DANC 2010 - Dance for the Theatre

    3 credit(s)

    Techniques of dance for musical, comedy, opera, television, style, and choreography for these forms. Prerequisite(s): DANC 1535, DANC 1545, DANC 1555, DANC 1565 or equivalent. As needed. (T)
  
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    DANC 2020 - Choreography

    3 credit(s)

    Explanation of movement technique sequences, and choreographic forms. Basic elements of notation. Prerequisite(s): DANC 1550, DANC 1555, DANC 2010. As needed. (T)
  
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    DANC 2500 - Dance Production

    1 credit(s)

    Supervised production work and practical exercises in all aspects of dance relating to the mounting of a performance for presentation. Course may be repeated for credit. As needed. (T)
  
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    DANC 2990 - Dance Problems

    1-3 credit(s)

    A course featuring in-depth study in the field of dance. The course may be repeated for credit provided the theme is not repeated. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. As needed. (T)
  
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    ECED 1310 - Introduction to Early Childhood Education

    3 credit(s)

    Introduction to Early Childhood Education is an introduction to the early childhood education profession, including an emphasis on professionalism and developmentally appropriate practice. This course also includes an overview of history of early education, theoretical program models, different types of early childhood programs, community resources, professional organizations, and contemporary trends and issues in programs for children ages birth through eight. Field experience required. Field experience required. Pre/Corequisite(s): MDTR 1010. F. (T)
  
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    ECED 2186 - Special Topics in Early Childhood Education

    1-3 credit(s)

    The study of programs, trends, and issues in the field of Early Childhood Education. As needed. (NIT)
  
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    ECED 2310 - Safe, Healthy Learning Environments

    3 credit(s)

    Safe, Healthy Learning Environments is a study of the basic principles and practices of safety, health, and nutrition as they relate to the early childhood setting, home, and community for children ages birth through eight. Also included is a study of principles of creating appropriate learning environments for young children. Field experience required. F, S. (T)
  
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    ECED 2312 - Administration of Early Childhood Programs

    3 credit(s)

    Administration of Early Childhood Programs is a study of organizational and administrative practices applicable to programs serving children ages birth through eight. Topics of particular consideration include leadership, enrollment, public relations, staff-management, financial management, facilities, regulations, family relations, and program development. As needed. (T)
  
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    ECED 2315 - Early Childhood Curriculum

    3 credit(s)

    Early Childhood Curriculum is a study of developmentally appropriate practices and the teacher’s role in supporting development of children ages birth through eight. Also included is an emphasis on curriculum planning including goals, environment, and roles of teachers and of families, materials, and settings. Field experience required. F, S. (T)
  
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    ECED 2320 - Infant, Toddler, Child Development

    3 credit(s)

    Infant, Toddler, Child Development is a study of the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of young children and their application to the care, guidance, and development of children from birth through eight. Field experience required. S. (T)
  
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    ECED 2330 - Infant and Toddler Care

    3 credit(s)

    Infant and Toddler Care is a study of the care and education of infants and toddlers ages birth to three in group settings (i.e. childcare centers, family childcare homes, Early Head Start, etc.). Topics includes rationales and strategies for supporting the whole child including cognitive, language, social-emotional, and physical development in a safe, responsive environment. The course emphasizes relationship-based care and education with special attention to the unique environmental aspects of programs for the child under three. Field experience required. As needed. (T)
  
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    ECED 2335 - Initial Practicum

    3 credit(s)

    Initial Practicum is a supervised practicum which includes a minimum of 30 clock hours in instruction and 45 clock hours in a clinical site approved by the department (accredited agency, 3-Star, or department-approved site). These hours may be completed in the student’s employment site with department approval. The course includes a study of the physical and human qualities that combine to create an environment that is safe and healthy and that promotes optimum learning for young children ages birth through eight. Any field experience requires proof of personal liability coverage. F, S. (NIT)
    1 hour lecture/3 hours clinical
  
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    ECED 2340 - Family Dynamics and Community Involvement

    3 credit(s)

    Family Dynamics and Community Involvement is a study of the role of the family and community in the physical, cognitive, social and emotional growth of the child ages birth through eight. Topics include the benefits of, and strategies for, developing positive, reciprocal relationships with families in an early childhood setting. Field experience required. F, S. (T)
  
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    ECED 2360 - Development of Exceptional Children

    3 credit(s)

    Development of Exceptional Children explores practices that early childhood professionals can apply to develop a more inclusive and accessible environment for children ages birth though eight. It provides students with skills to include children of all abilities through appropriate arrangement of the environment. The course includes strategies for developing strong relationships with families and other community agencies. Field experience required. F, S. (T)
  
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    ECED 2365 - Final Practicum

    3 credit(s)

    Final Practicum is a supervised clinical experience with a minimum of 15 clock hours in instruction and 90 clock hours in a clinical site approved by the department (accredited agency, 3-star or department-approved site). Up to 45 hours may be completed in the student’s employment site with department approval. Focuses on the student’s demonstration of competencies that produce positive developmental outcomes for young children ages birth through eight. Prerequisite(s): ECED 2335. This should be one of the last courses taken in the ECED program. Any field experience requires proof of personal liability coverage. As needed. (NIT)
    1 hour lecture/2 hours laboratory
  
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    ECED 2370 - Developmental Assessment

    3 credit(s)

    Developmental Assessment covers assessment for children from ages birth through eight. Both formal and informal instruments will be discussed, emphasizing tools that can be effectively used by teachers of young children. Considerations in choosing, administering, and reporting results of assessments are also addressed. Field experience required. As needed. (T)
  
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    ECED 2375 - Social-Emotional Development

    3 credit(s)

    This course addresses promotion, prevention, and intervention strategies related to young children’s social-emotional development and challenging behavior. The course is built around the Teaching Pyramid (Fox, Dunlap, Hemmeter, Joseph & Strain, 2003), which is a framework for understanding effective practices related to supporting young children’s social-emotional development and addressing challenging behavior. The model includes a focuses on building relationships with children, families, and colleagues. The course also stressed designing environments that support young children’s social-emotional competence, developing strategies for teaching social skills, and promoting emotional development. It includes a systematic approach for addressing challenging behavior when it is persistent and not responsive to developmentally appropriate guidance procedures. As needed. (NIT)
  
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    ECED 2380 - Language and Literacy in Early Childhood

    3 credit(s)

    Language and Literacy in Early Childhood focuses on research-based principles and practices for providing young children ages birth through eight with a strong foundation in language and literacy, using a developmentally appropriate approach. Field experience required. As needed. (T)
  
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    ECED 2385 - Math and Science in Early Childhood

    3 credit(s)

    Math and Science in Early Childhood is a course covering the standards, principles, and practices in teaching mathematics and science to young children ages birth through eight. The course emphasizes developing an integrated math and science curriculum that includes appropriate content, processes, environment and materials, and child-centered choices. Field experience required. As needed. (T)
  
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    ECED 2390 - Creative Development

    3 credit(s)

    Creative Development provides strategies for promoting creative development of the young child ages birth through eight. Topics include understanding the concept of creativity: what it is, why it is important, and how the development of creativity relates to art, music, movement, and drama. Field experience required. As needed. (T)
  
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    ECON 2100 - Principles of Macroeconomics

    3 credit(s)

    A study of basic macroeconomic concepts including GDP, economic growth, unemployment and inflation.  Also includes a thorough examination of both fiscal and monetary policy. F, S, Su. (T)
  
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    ECON 2200 - Principles of Microeconomics

    3 credit(s)

    Microeconomics is the study of firms, industries, and consumers to include the following topics: supply and demand, elasticity of demand and supply, production and cost theory, market structure and consumer choice theory. F, S, Su. (T)
  
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    ECON 2210 - Business Statistical Applications

    3 credit(s)

    A statistics course that includes the study of descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, correlation and regression, simple index numbers, tests for independence, and an introduction to time series and process control. Applications will be business oriented. Students cannot receive credit for both MATH 2050 and ECON 2210 and should consult their advisor for correct course prefix. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1830 or MATH 1910 or permission of instructor. F, S. (T)
  
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    EDUC 1010 - The Freshman Experience

    1 credit(s)

    Introduction to college opportunities, procedures, resources and services. Topics include personal enhancement and development, improving academic skills, career possibilities, information about the college, and other success related topics. F, S. (T)
  
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    EDUC 1030 - The College Experience

    3 credit(s)

    This course is designed to empower the student as he/she attempts to set and maintain realistic personal and educational goals. Emphasis is on developing reading, writing, math, and other effective learning strategies. Other topics include exploration of learning styles and diversity on a college campus, development of critical thinking skills, and introduction to campus resources and use of technology. F, S, Su. (T)
  
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    EDUC 1130 - Drivers Education: Defensive and Tactical Driving

    3 credit(s)

    This course is designed to instill in students the knowledge and skill of vehicular defensive driving. The decisions needed to drive defensively and legality issues of driving are emphasized. As needed. (T)
  
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    EDUC 2100 - Orientation to the Profession of Education

    1 credit(s)

    This course will provide the student interested in the teaching profession with a survey of the opportunities, problems, and realities of teaching. Students will learn about the obligations and responsibilities inherent in teaching. Current topics will be analyzed and discussed. Any field experience requires proof of personal liability coverage. This course is specifically designed for the student who intends to enroll in the Professional Education Core at East Tennessee State University. Other education students may also enroll. As needed. (T)
  
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    EDUC 2110 - Career Planning for the 21st Century

    1 credit(s)

    This course examines the nature of careers and the education-work system in which careers unfold. The course introduces the concept of careers as work-related positions, including all jobs and all training and honorary positions stemming from or leading to those jobs. Highlights of the job market outlook are presented. A key component of the course will be the initial development of a pre-professional portfolio. This course is offered in the spring semester only, and is available to students who have completed at least 24 hours. As needed. (T)
  
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    EDUC 2210 - Educational Psychology

    3 credit(s)

    Understanding and application of the psychology of human development to the teaching and learning process in educational settings. There is a significant outside of class time service-learning component to this class. Any field experience requires proof of personal liability coverage and a criminal background check. F, S. (T)
  
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    EDUC 2300 - Introduction to Education

    3 credit(s)

    Survey of historical, sociological, philosophical, and legal foundations of American education, with an overview of school in America, the role and responsibility of the teacher, and an introduction to instructional technology principles. The course combines classroom discussion with field study as a means to analyze the teaching profession. There is a significant outside of class time service-learning component to this class. Any field experience requires proof of personal liability coverage and a criminal background check.

      Prerequisite(s): ACT composite score of 22 or successful completion of PRAXIS CORE. F, S. (T)

  
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    EDUC 2400 - Drivers Education: Vehicle Dynamics Awareness

    3 credit(s)

    This course is designed to acquaint students with the safe handling dynamics of automobiles which they regularly drive. Students must demonstrate safe practical skills while operating an automobile at various speeds, execute safe skid control techniques, and low speed precision skill maneuvers as they pertain to daily vehicle operations. As needed. (T)
  
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    EDUC 2450 - Drivers Education: Advanced Technical Driving

    3 credit(s)

    This course is designed to prepare drivers with the tactical knowledge and practical skills to execute advanced vehicle maneuvers. Also, this course can prepare drivers to plan and evaluate instructor objectives, student outcomes, organize subject matter, and communicate those principles as they pertain to public sector driving training. As needed. (T)
  
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    EDUC 2810 - Honors Seminar: Leadership Development

    3 credit(s)

    This course has as its focus the development of leadership ability. The course provides a basic understanding of leadership and group dynamics theory and assists the student in developing a personal philosophy of leadership, an awareness of the oral and ethical responsibilities of leadership, and an awareness of one’s own ability and style of leadership; it provides the opportunity to develop essential leadership skills through study and observation of the application of these skills. The course encourages participants to develop their leadership potential and to engage in productive leadership behavior. As needed. (T)
  
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    EDUC 2818 - Honors Program Seminar

    1-3 credit(s)

    This course will provide support to the student that is a part of the Walters State Honors Program. Through this course, honors program students will experience a number of topics to include but not be limited to his or her leadership style and potential, continued career exploration, speakers on honors topics, field trips to exhibits in support of the honors program, and a service learning experience. Admittance into this course will be based upon acceptance into the Walters State Honors Program with permission of the instructor. As needed. (T)
  
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    EDUC 2910 - Field Study in Education

    3 credit(s)

    This course builds on observation techniques and is designed to expose students to the field of teaching. It is a pre-practicum experience including classroom observation, attendance of school board meetings, lesson plans, etc. Due to the laboratory nature of this course, final evaluation will be recognized by a grade of Pass (P) or Fail (F). Prerequisite(s): This course requires a 45-hour field observation component. Class meeting times are adjusted to accommodate for this field component. Any field experience requires proof of personal liability coverage. As needed. (T)
    1 hour lecture/3 hours laboratory
  
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    EDUC 2990 - Problems in Education

    1-3 credit(s)

    Designed for the study of special problems and/or current topics in the field of education. May also be used for preparation for the ACT. As needed. (T)
  
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    EETC 1311 - Electric Circuits I

    3 credit(s)

    An introductory course in DC and AC circuits. Topics include atomic structure, current and voltage, resistance, power, Ohm’s Law, series, parallel and series-parallel circuits. Transient response for capacitors and inductors are also discussed. Fundamental AC concepts and phasor calculations for impedance, voltage, and current in RLC circuits are also covered. Coverage of electrical measurement equipment, including multimeters and oscilloscopes is included. Prerequisite(s): ENST 1300 or completion of all Learning Support mathematics courses. As Needed. (NIT)
    2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory
  
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    EETC 1312 - Electric Circuits II

    3 credit(s)

    A continuation of Electric Circuits I covering topics on a more advanced level. DC topics include Network Theorems such as Mesh and Nodal Analysis, Superposition, Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits. AC topics include series and parallel resonance, filters, and three-phase power. Transformers and motors are also covered. Prerequisite(s): EETC 1311. S. (NIT)
    2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory
  
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    EETC 1321 - Electronics I

    3 credit(s)

    An introductory course in solid state devices. Topics include rectification, filters, voltage regulation, characteristic curves, graphical analysis of amplification, amplifier configurations, amplifier equivalent circuits , gain equations, static and dynamic load lines, and biasing in the electronics field. Prerequisite(s): EETC 1311. S. (NIT)
    2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory
  
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    EETC 1331 - Digital Fundamentals

    3 credit(s)

    An introductory course in digital logic systems. Topics include logic gates, boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, and the analysis of combinational logic circuits such as flip-flops and other multivibrators. Prerequisite(s): ENST 1300 or completion of all Learning Support mathematics courses. F. (NIT)
    2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory
  
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    EETC 1340 - Introduction to Biomedical Technology

    3 credit(s)

    This course is an introduction to and overview of the Biomedical Engineering Technology field. The course will cover an introduction to the careers in the Biomedical Engineering Technology field, measuring the physiological variables in humans, medical technology management, electrical safety in a healthcare environment, and remote patient monitoring. S. (NIT)
    2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory
  
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    EETC 1341 - Biomedical Technology Safety

    3 credit(s)

    This course covers the critical safety codes required for operating a healthcare facility. Areas covered include electrical safety, gas and vacuum safety, HVAC safety, emergency and security management, and fire protection safety. F. (NIT)
    2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory
  
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    EETC 2291 - Internship

    2 credit(s)

    A supervised work program designed to provide students with a variety of practical on-the-job experiences within the industrial field (compensated or uncompensated). This will allow students to apply their knowledge to real world situations and to build relationships with companies prior to graduation. Prerequisite(s): EETC 1340, EETC 1341. As needed. (NIT)
    2 hours lecture/minimum 5 hours clinical experience
  
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    EETC 2311 - Power Technology

    3 credit(s)

    An introductory course in industrial power systems. Topics include transformer operation and types, load configurations, power factor correction, and the study of the National electrical Code (NEC). Prerequisite(s): EETC 1311. S. (NIT)
    2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory
  
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    EETC 2331 - PLC I

    3 credit(s)

    An introductory course in programmable logic controllers. Topics include ladder logic diagram reading and development leading to the programming of a PLC to communicate through various input and output devices and control various mechanical functions within a manufacturing system. Prerequisite(s): EETC 1311. S. (NIT)
    2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory
  
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    EETC 2332 - PLC II

    3 credit(s)

    This course covers advanced topics in PLC programming such as servo motors and encoders, material handling systems, networking of control systems and HMI (Human Machine Interface) design. Prerequisite(s): EETC 2331. F. (NIT)
  
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    EETC 2340 - Biomedical Instrumentation I

    3 credit(s)

    This is an introductory course in biomedical instrumentation. Content covers human anatomy and physiology as it related to healthcare equipment. Biomedical instrumentation equipment using both analog and digital technologies will be covered. The relationship between biomedical instrumentation as it relates to various human physiological systems will also be studied. Prerequisite(s): EETC 1340. F. (NIT)
    2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory
  
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    EETC 2341 - Biomedical Instrumentation II

    3 credit(s)

    This is a follow-up course in biomedical instrumentation. Content covers medical imaging systems, fiber optics, lasers, advanced safety, preventive maintenance and safety regulations and standards. Specialty equipment used in ICU, CCU, and surgical environments will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): EETC 2340. S. (NIT)
    2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory
  
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    EETC 2350 - Integrated Robotics

    3 credit(s)

    This course is a study of robotic technology integration into an automated manufacturing system. Prerequisite(s): EETC 2331. S. (NIT)
    2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory
  
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    EETC 2390 - Capstone

    3 credit(s)

    This course provides a platform for students to apply required skills and knowledge to complete a multifaceted project relative to the field of study. This course is to be taken during the student’s final semester. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. As Needed. (NIT)
    2 hours lecture/2 hours laboratory
  
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    EETC 2391 - Internship

    3 credit(s)

    A supervised work program designed to provide students with a variety of practical on-the-job experiences within the industrial field (compensated or uncompensated). This will allow students to apply their knowledge to real-world situations and to build relationships with companies prior to graduation.  This course is to be taken during the student’s final semester. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. As Needed. (NIT)
    2 hours lecture/minimum 5 hours working experience
  
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    EETC 2399 - Special Topics

    3 credit(s)

    This course provides a platform for students to independently study special topics not otherwise included in the base curriculum. As needed. (NIT)
  
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    EGRT 2020 - Technology and Society

    3 credit(s)

    How does technology impact society and one’s daily life? Historical aspects of the development of technology beginning with Stone Age peoples through the Industrial Revolution, to modern concepts. An atmosphere where group discussions struggle with some of the dilemmas of modern life. As Needed. (T)
  
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    EGRT 2170 - CADD (Computer Aided Design Drafting)

    4 credit(s)

    Fundamentals of engineering drawing and sketching: orthographic projections, dimensioning, tolerancing, and scaling. Introduction to the CAD interface and environment; 2D drawing basics; using object snaps, layers, blocks, dimensioning; introduction to 3D modeling; extrusions, revolves, and rendering. S. (T)
  
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    EGRT 2200 - Machine Tool Principles

    4 credit(s)

    The use of metalworking machine tools and accessories including the mill, lathe, saw, drill press, and surface grinder with emphasis on safety, precision measuring tools, and hand tools. Machining characteristics of commonly machined metals, cutting speeds, and feed rates. Cutting tool types, geometry, and applications.  Prerequisite(s): EGRT 2170, MATH 1720. S. (T)
  
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    EGRT 2310 - Electrical Principles

    4 credit(s)

    Introduction to electricity, DC circuits, power, DC meters, conductors, insulators, capacitance, magnetism, and electromagnetic induction AC circuits, reactance, impedance, AC power, power factor, and resonance.   Prerequisite(s): MATH 1720 or permission of instructor. S. (T)
  
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    EGRT 2320 - Electronics I

    4 credit(s)

    Devices, rectification, filters, voltage regulation, characteristic curves, graphical analysis of amplification, amplifier configurations, amplifier equivalent circuits, gain equations, static and dynamic load lines, and biasing.  Prerequisite(s): EGRT 2310 or permission of instructor. S. (T)
  
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    EGRT 2370 - Digital Circuits

    4 credit(s)

    Introduction to digital logic, binary numbers and codes, Boolean algebra, gating networks, flipflops, counters, registers, arithmetic circuits, code conversion, decoding, and memory circuits.  Prerequisite(s): MATH 1720 or permission of instructor. F. (T)
  
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    EMRC 1010 - Emergency Medical Responder

    4 credit(s)

    This initial training course in the art of pre-hospital emergency medical care follows the guidelines set by the National Scope of Practice Model and an institutional required Clinical Practicum. Successful completion enables the student to sit for the certification examination given by the Tennessee Health, Emergency Medical Services. Emergency Medical Responders are individuals trained to assess patients, provide emergency care, and when necessary, move patients without causing injury. CPR training and certification is included in the course. F, S, Su. (NIT)
  
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    EMSA 1111 - Advanced EMT Clinical

    1 credit(s)

    The Advanced EMT Clinical is one of two course designed to allow the student to meet all psychomotor and affective objectives for the clinical requirements of an Advanced Emergency Medical Technician program and build upon the concepts and knowledge gained during and/or concurrent courses. The outcomes presented in EMSA 1111 and EMSA 1112 may be taught in a coterminous format or in a two-semester format. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading, Writing, and Math or permission of instructor. Corequisite(s): EMSA 1501, EMSA 1201. F, S. (NIT)
  
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    EMSA 1112 - Advanced EMT Field Internship

    1 credit(s)

    The Advanced EMT Field Internship is one of two courses designed to allow the student to meet all psychomotor and affective objectives for the clinical requirements of an Advanced Emergency Medical Technician program and build upon the concepts and knowledge gained during prior and/or concurrent courses. The outcomes presented in EMSA 1111 and EMSA 1112 may be taught in a coterminous format or in a two-semester format. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading, Writing, and Math or permission of instructor. Pre/Corequisite(s): EMSA 1111, EMSA 1502, EMSA 1202. F, S. (NIT)
  
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    EMSA 1201 - Advanced EMT Medical Skills Lab

    2 credit(s)

    The Advanced EMT Medical Skills Lab is one of two laboratory based courses intended to focus the student on developing skills related to theory presented in didactic classes taken as co-requisites for this course. This laboratory experience will utilize scenarios to emphasize airway maintenance, medication administration, and successfully assessing patients with a variety of medical concerns. The outcomes presented in EMSA 1201 and EMSA 1202 may be taught in a coterminous format or in a two-semester format. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading, Writing, and Math or permission of instructor. Corequisite(s): EMSA 1501, EMSA 1111. F, S. (NIT)
  
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    EMSA 1202 - Advanced EMT Trauma and Medical Skills Lab

    2 credit(s)

    The Advanced EMT Trauma and Medical Skills Lab is one of two laboratory based courses intended to focus the student on developing skills related to theory presented in didactic classes taken as co-requisites for this course. This laboratory experience will utilize scenarios to emphasize airway maintenance, medication administration, and successfully assessing patients with a variety of medical concerns. The outcomes presented in EMSA 1201 and EMSA 1202 may be taught in a coterminous format or in a two-semester format. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading, Writing, and Math or permission of instructor. Pre/Corequisite(s): EMSA 1201,  EMSA 1502, EMSA 1112. F, S. (NIT)
  
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    EMSA 1501 - Advanced EMT Medical Emergencies

    5 credit(s)

    The Advanced EMT Medical Emergencies is one of two lecture courses which includes basic and limited advanced skills focused on the acute management and transportation of critical and emergency patients. This course includes the following topics: Emergency Medical Responder and Emergency Medical Technician-National Educational Standards competencies, roles and responsibilities of the AEMT, workforce safety, wellness, public health, communications, documentation, medical/legal/ethical considerations, anatomy and physiology, life span development, pathophysiology, patient assessment, critical thinking, airway management, respiratory emergencies, cardiovascular emergencies, acute diabetic emergencies, abdominal and gastrointestinal emergencies, urologic emergencies, anaphylactic reactions, and behavioral emergencies. The outcomes presented in EMSA 1501 and EMSA 1502 may be taught in a coterminous format or in a two-semester format. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading, Writing, and Math or permission of instructor. Corequisite(s): EMSA 1201, EMSA 1111. F, S. (NIT)
  
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    EMSA 1502 - Advanced EMT Trauma and Medical Emergencies

    5 credit(s)

    The Advanced EMT Trauma and Medical Emergencies is one of two lecture courses which includes basic and limited advanced skills focuses on the acute management and transportation of critical and emergency patients. This course includes the following topics: obstetrics and gynecology, neonatal care, pediatric emergencies, geriatric emergencies, environmental emergencies, patients with special challenges, EMS operations, trauma and shock. Trauma and shock will include the following topics: bleeding, soft tissue injuries, head and spine injuries, face and neck injuries, chest injuries, abdominal and genitourinary injuries, and orthopedic injuries. The outcomes presented in EMSA 1501 and EMSA 1502 may be taught in a coterminous format or in a two-semester format. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading, Writing, and Math or permission of instructor. Pre/Corequisite(s): EMSA 1501, EMSA 1202, EMSA 1112. F, S. (NIT)
  
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    EMSB 1101 - EMT Medical Skills Lab

    1 credit(s)

    EMT Medical Skills Lab is a laboratory based course utilizing scenarios to emphasize EMS operations, communications, documentation, medical/legal/ethical considerations, airway management, respiratory emergencies, cardiovascular emergencies, acute diabetic emergencies, abdominal and gastrointestinal emergencies, urological emergencies, anaphylactic reactions, behavioral emergencies, assisting with medication administration, and successful assessment of patients with a variety of medical concerns. This course includes application of principles and processes in EMT Medical Emergencies. The outcomes presented in EMSB 1101 and EMSB 1102 may be taught in a coterminous format or in a two-semester format. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the EMT Program; completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing or permission of instructor. Corequisite(s): EMSB 1601, EMSB 1111. As needed. (NIT)
  
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    EMSB 1102 - Trauma and Medicals Skills Lab

    1 credit(s)

    EMT Trauma and Medical Skills Lab is a laboratory based course utilizing scenarios to emphasize obstetrics and gynecology, neonatal care, pediatric emergencies, geriatric emergencies, environmental emergencies, patients with special challenges, trauma and shock. The outcomes presented in EMSB 1101 and EMSB 1102 may be taught in a coterminous format or in a two-semester format. Pre/Corequisite(s): EMSB 1601, EMSB 1101, EMSB 1111, EMSB 1602, EMSB 1102 depending on delivery schedule; completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing or instructor approval. As needed. (NIT)
  
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    EMSB 1111 - EMT Clinical

    1 credit(s)

    EMT Clinical is the one of two clinical courses designed to allow the student to meet all psychomotor and affective outcomes for the clinical requirements of an EMT program and build upon the concepts and knowledge learned in EMT Medical Emergencies and EMS Operations. The outcomes presented in EMSB 1111 and EMSB 1112 may be taught in a coterminous format or in a two-semester format. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the EMT Program; completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing or permission of instructor. Corequisite(s): EMSB 1601, EMSB 1101. As needed. (NIT)
  
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    EMSB 1112 - EMT Field Internship

    1 credit(s)

    EMT Field Internship is one of two clinical courses designed to allow the student to meet all psychomotor and affective outcomes for the clinical requirements of an EMT program and build upon the concepts and knowledge learned during prior and/or concurrent courses. The outcomes presented in EMSB 1111 and EMSB 1112 may be taught in a coterminous format or in a two-semester format. Pre/Corequisite(s): EMSB 1601, EMSB 1101, EMSB 1111, EMSB 1602, EMSB 1102 depending on delivery schedule; completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing or instructor approval. As needed. (NIT)
  
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    EMSB 1401 - Emergency Medical Responder

    4 credit(s)

    Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) is a lecture designed to provide the student with the knowledge of an Emergency Medical Responder (EMR).  This course includes the following topics: Emergency Medical Responder-National Educational Standards competencies, CPR training and certification, introduction to EMS operations, roles and responsibilities of the EMR, workforce safety, wellness, medical/legal/ethical issues, medical terminology, fundamental anatomy and physiology, life span development, airway management, AED cardiac resuscitation, patient assessment,  communications, documentation, respiratory emergencies, cardiac emergencies, altered mental status, medical emergencies, traumatic emergencies, environmental emergencies, obstetric emergencies, pediatric emergencies, and geriatric emergencies.   Successful completion enables the student to sit for the certification examination given by the Tennessee Health, Emergency Medical Services.  The outcomes presented in EMSB 1401, EMSB 1402, and EMSB 1403 may be taught in a coterminous format or in a two-semester format.  F, S, Su. (NIT)
  
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    EMSB 1402 - Fundamentals of Emergency Medical Technician I

    4 credit(s)

    EMT Medical Emergencies and EMS Operations is the one of two lecture courses designed to provide the student with the knowledge of an entry-level Emergency Medical Technician (EMT).  This course includes the following topics: Emergency Medical Responder-National Educational Standards competencies, roles and responsibilities of the EMT, workforce safety, wellness, public health, communications, documentation, EMS operations, medical/legal/ethical considerations, fundamental anatomy and physiology, life span development, fundamental pathophysiology, patient assessment,  airway management, respiratory emergencies, cardiovascular emergencies, acute diabetic emergencies, abdominal and gastrointestinal emergencies, urologic emergencies, anaphylactic reactions, and behavioral emergencies.  The outcomes presented in EMSB 1401, EMSB 1402, and EMSB 1403 may be taught in a coterminous format or in a two-semester format. 

    Prerequisite(s): EMSB 1401, Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading, Writing, and Math or permission of instructor. Corequisite(s): EMSB 1401, EMSB 1403, EMSB 1101, EMSB 1111, EMSB 1102, EMSB 1112. F, S. (NIT)
  
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    EMSB 1403 - Fundamentals of Emergency Medical Technician II

    4 credit(s)

    EMT Trauma and Medical Emergencies is the one of two lecture courses designed to provide the student with the knowledge of an entry-level Emergency Medical Technician (EMT).  This course includes the following topics: obstetrics and gynecology, neonatal care, pediatric emergencies, geriatric emergencies, environmental emergencies, patients with special challenges, trauma and shock.  Trauma and shock will include the following topics: bleeding, soft tissue injuries, head & spine injuries, face & neck injuries, chest injuries, abdominal & genitourinary injuries, and orthopedic injuries. The outcomes presented in EMSB 1401, EMSB 1402 and EMSB 1403 may be taught in a coterminous format or in a two-semester format. 

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading, Writing, and Math or permission of instructor. Corequisite(s): EMSB 1401, EMSB 1402, EMSB 1101, EMSB 1111, EMSB 1102, EMSB 1112. F, S. (NIT)
  
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    EMSB 1601 - EMT Medical Emergencies

    6 credit(s)

    EMT Medical Emergencies and EMS Operations is one of two lecture courses designed to provide the student with the knowledge of an entry-level Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). This course includes the following topics: Emergency Medical Responder-National Educational Standards competencies, roles and responsibilities of the EMT, workforce safety, wellness, public health, communications, documentation, EMS operations, medical/legal/ethical considerations, fundamental anatomy and physiology, life span development, fundamental pathophysiology, patient assessment, airway management, respiratory emergencies, cardiovascular emergencies, acute diabetic emergencies, abdominal and gastrointestinal emergencies, urological emergencies, anaphylactic reactions, and behavioral emergencies. The outcomes presented in EMSB 1601 and EMSB 1602 may be taught in a coterminous format or in a two-semester format. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the EMT Program. Corequisite(s): EMSB 1101, EMSB 1111; completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing or permission of insturctor. As needed. (NIT)
  
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    EMSB 1602 - EMT Trauma and Medical Emergencies

    6 credit(s)

    EMT Trauma and Medical Emergencies is one of two lecture courses designed to provide the student with the knowledge of an entry-level Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). This course includes the following topics: obstetrics and gynecology, neonatal care, pediatric emergencies, geriatric emergencies, environmental emergencies, patients with special challenges, trauma and shock. Trauma and shock will include the following topics: bleeding, soft tissue injuries, head and spine injuries, face and neck injuries, chest injuries, abdominal and genitourinary injuries, and orthopedic injuries. The outcomes presented in EM SB 1601 and EM SB 1602 may be taught in a coterminous format or in a two-semester format. Pre/Corequisite(s): EMSB 1601, EMSB 1101, EMSB 1111, EMSB 1102 EMSB 1112 depending on delivery schedule; completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing or instructor approval. As needed. (NIT)
 

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