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    Walters State Community College
   
 
  Jul 25, 2017
 
 
    
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2009-10 Catalog and Student Handbook [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Academic Information


 

Plan Your Educational Program

It is the responsibility of the student to select an educational program of study and register for and complete courses required in the selected program as outlined in this catalog. The faculty and counselors at Walters State Community College take pride in assisting the student in program planning and course selection. Each student will be advised by a faculty member from the department of the major field of study to assist in planning the student’s program of study.

Should it be necessary to deviate from the suggested curriculum of courses, the student should consult the head of the department in the major field of study in order to prepare a course substitution request.

Transfer of Credit

Any student planning to transfer the first two years of college level credit from Walters State to a four-year college or university should secure a copy of that institution’s catalog/articulation agreement/equivalency table and reflect upon it during advising and registration to ensure that the courses selected meet the first two years’ requirements at the receiving institution.

Please be advised that should there be a question regarding the transfer of credit from Walters State Community College by the four-year school, a copy of the transfer evaluation from the four-year school must be provided to a Student Success Center staff member for the purposes of discussing the course(s) in question.

For assistance regarding transfer of credit from Walters State to a four-year institution, please contact the Student Success Center, CCEN-259, by telephone at 423-318-2337 or by visiting the Walters State web page at www.ws.edu.

Attendance Regulations

Students must attend the first day of class or contact the instructor prior to the first class if they intend to remain in the class. If this procedure is not followed, the students may be administratively dropped from the class, and other students allowed to take their positions. Students who are withdrawn from classes under this policy will receive a drop form marked “attendance withdrawal.”

Attendance at classes and other official appointments is required. A student’s schedule is considered a contract and constitutes a series of obligated appointments.

Absences are counted from the first scheduled meeting of the class. An explanation for the cause of all absences should be given each instructor. If possible, students should inform instructors in advance of planned absences.

IMPORTANT: Non-attendance does not constitute a withdrawal from classes or from the college. Procedures to formally drop a course or to withdraw from the college must be followed. Following these procedures may prevent students from receiving an undeserved “F” on their transcript.

Academic and Classroom Misconduct

The instructor has the primary responsibility for control over classroom behavior and maintenance of academic integrity and can order the temporary removal or exclusion from the classroom of any student engaged in disruptive conduct or conduct violative of the general rules and regulations of the institution. Extended or permanent exclusion from the classroom or further disciplinary action can be effected only through appropriate procedures of the institution.

Plagiarism, cheating, and other forms of academic dishonesty are prohibited. Students guilty of academic misconduct, either directly or indirectly through participation or assistance, are subject to disciplinary action. In addition to possible disciplinary sanctions which may be imposed through the regular institutional procedures as a result of academic misconduct, the instructor has the authority to assign an “F” or a zero for the exercise or examination, or to assign an “F” for the course.

If the student believes that the accusation of academic misconduct is in error, and if the final grade has been lowered as a result, an appeal may be made by following institutional procedures.

Student use of Personal or Portable Electronic Communication Devices

The importance of portable electronic communication devices is recognized as a method of communication for those students and visitors to the college with emergency needs or activities. It is also recognized that these devices permit certain individuals to attend classes and other activities that they might otherwise be unable to attend due to off-campus responsibilities or duties.

Walters State Community College assumes the primary responsibility for maintaining control over facility climate and environment. These same communication devices must not interfere with, or disrupt, the instructional process or college-sponsored activity, such as a class, guest lecture or concert. A student or visitor may wear an electronic beeper provided the device is set so that it will not produce an audible sound during classroom instruction or other college-sponsored activities.

Cellular phone use during classroom instruction or college-sponsored activity is prohibited. Cellular phones must be turned to the non-audible mode until after class, at which time calls can be received or checked.

The college has the responsibility to ensure that the facility environment remains relatively free from interruptions and disturbances. In the event of an emergency, the student or visitor should exit the room quietly and with as little disruption as possible. Students consistently bear the primary responsibility of keeping their instructors informed of any occurrence that may affect their academic performance.

Pets on Campus Policy

Pets are not allowed on Walters State Community College campuses. Exceptions will be made only for students with identified disabilities. When exceptions are made, pets that are allowed on campus must be on a leash under the direct and positive control of the individual responsible for the pet. Such individuals will be liable for any accident or damage caused by the pet while on campus.

Minors on Campus Policy

Walters State Community College is an institution of higher education and as such must preserve conditions that will permit a proper learning and working environment at all times. Thus, minor children must not be left unsupervised on campus. It is not the intent of this policy to prevent children in the accompaniment of an adult from visiting the campus. However, consideration for the learning environment of the student, the work routine of staff employees, and the safety of the children requires that children may not accompany adults into classrooms, offices, or other work spaces as a baby-sitting function nor be left unsupervised in the hallways of buildings or on the grounds of the college.

In certain circumstances, children may be on campus for classes held for their benefit (EDU Camps, field trips, etc.). At such times, it is expected that the instructor or responsible adult will supervise the activities of the children, and that before and after the class an area will be designated for the children to await the arrival of their parents. It is the responsibility of the supervisor/instructor of these activities to explain these restrictions to the children and to monitor the enforcement where feasible.

Student Load

The recommended semester-hour load for the average student is 15 to 16 hours of credit. A student desiring to take more than 21 semester hours of credit must receive approval prior to registration by completing an Overload Request form with approving signatures from the advisor, division dean, and the vice president for Academic Affairs.

Minimum Class Size

An undergraduate course will not normally be given for fewer than 15 students except by permission of the vice president for Academic Affairs. The college reserves the right to cancel, postpone, or combine classes when necessary.

Grading System

The following grading system is used at Walters State Community College.

Grade Quality Points Awarded
Per Semester Hour
 
  A - Highest Proficiency 4  
  B - High Proficiency 3  
  C - Proficiency 2  
  D - Low Proficiency 1  
  F - Failure 0  

The scholastic standing of a student is expressed in terms of quality point ratio. A quality point ratio is the total number of quality points divided by the total number of semester hours attempted, less the number of hours repeated. To meet degree requirements, a student must maintain an overall quality point average of 2.00.

Other markings which may appear on the grade report and/or transcript are as follows:

I - Incomplete R - Repeated    
IP - In progress W - Withdrew    
AU - Audit; no grade or credit WF - Withdrew failing    
P - Passed X - No grade reported    
N/C - No Credit      

The mark “I” means that the student was passing at the end of the semester but had not completed all the course work. The student receiving an “I” should contact the instructor immediately in an effort to complete course requirements. The incomplete course requirements must be completed by a date agreed upon between the instructor and the student but no later than the drop deadline of the next semester (see College Calendar  for specific dates). If the incomplete is not removed, it will be counted as an “F” and computed in the quality point average.

The mark of “IP” is used only for developmental education courses. It means the student has made satisfactory progress in a course but has not completely mastered the required competency levels. The “IP” is not computed in the quality point average and must be removed during the succeeding semester. If it is not removed the succeeding semester, it will be counted as an “F” and computed in the quality point average.

The mark of “P” means the student successfully completed a course but a grade was not assigned. Credit towards meeting graduating requirements is awarded for a “P” but this mark has no affect on the quality point average. The following courses are approved for a grade of “P”: biology labs, physics labs, writing labs, and any other courses approved by the vice president for Academic Affairs.

The mark of “NC” means no credit. No quality points were awarded.

The mark of “R” is a transcript symbol used to indicate the student repeated a course.

The mark of “W” means the student withdrew from a course. Withdrawal from a course does not affect the quality point average. The dates the student may withdraw are specified each semester in the Timetable of Classes. Permission to withdraw after that date must be recommended by the instructor and approved by the vice president for Academic Affairs.

The mark of “WF” means the student withdrew from a course with a failing grade. The “WF” will be computed as an “F” in calculating the quality point average.

The mark of “X” means the instructor is unable to complete the course evaluation due to reasons beyond the student’s control. Grades will be assigned when the evaluation is completed.

Grade Protests

Grades, transcript information, drop/adds, withdrawals and other data perceived by the student to be in error must be protested by the student during the subsequent semester. Protests made after this time will not be reviewed.

Grade Appeal Procedure

Student appeals concerning a course grade should be resolved by conference between the student and the instructor who assigned the grade within 45 calendar days from the day grades are loaded in SIS as stated in the Timetable of Classes. If the concern is not resolved the student may begin the formal grade appeal procedure following the process below.

Grounds for Appeal

  1. Errors in calculation: The student appeals an error made in the mathematical calculations of graded material.
  2. Errors in course practices: The student contends that there is gross disparity between the course syllabus and the manner in which the course is conducted in regards to the treatment of the individual student.

Procedures for Appeal

  1. Following the initial conference with the instructor, the student has seven calendar days to complete the Grade Appeal Form which may be obtained from the division secretary in each division. The student must sign and date the completed form in the presence of the instructor at a mutually agreed upon time.
  2. The instructor’s response must be submitted to the department head, if applicable, or the division dean within seven calendar days of the student’s signature.
  3. The response from the department head/division dean must be submitted to the student within seven calendar days of the instructor’s signature. If the student wishes to appeal further, the division dean must submit the Grade Appeal Form to the vice president for Academic Affairs.
  4. The response from the vice president for Academic Affairs must be submitted to the student within seven calendar days of the division dean’s signature. If the student wishes to appeal further, the vice president for Academic Affairs will submit the Grade Appeal Form to the Academic Affairs Committee.
  5. The Academic Affairs Committee will hear the appeal at the next regularly scheduled meeting. The Academic Affairs Committee will render a response at the conclusion of the meeting.
  6. If a student wishes to further pursue the appeal, the vice president for Academic Affairs will take the appeal to the president. The president will have seven calendar days to render a decision. The president’s decision is final.

The failure of the student to proceed from one level of the appeal procedure to the next level within the prescribed time limits shall be deemed to be an acceptance of the outcome previously rendered. All further considerations and proceedings regarding that particular appeal shall cease at that point.

Repeated Courses

For the purpose of increasing mastery in a course when such is necessary for successful performance in a subsequent course or for the purpose of increasing the quality point average, a student may repeat a course provided the grade of “C” or lower was earned in the course to be repeated. The grade received in repeating the course supersedes all previous grades. The hours attempted for repeating a course are counted only once and credited in the semester in which the course was repeated. Students are permitted to repeat a course twice (three attempts) under the preceding condition. After three attempts, the grades in the third and subsequent attempts are used in calculating the quality point average.

Students may be permitted to repeat a course in which a grade of “B” or higher was earned only with the approval of the vice president for Academic Affairs.

Academic Fresh Start

Any person who has not been enrolled in a college or university for a period of four years and who, upon re-enrolling at Walters State Community College, maintains a 2.00 GPA and completes 15 semester hours of Level 1 course work at Walters State, may petition to have grades on all prior course work disregarded in calculating the cumulative grade point average. Removal of grades means removal of all credits. Upon the completion of 15 semester hours at Walters State with a 2.00 cumulative GPA, the student should complete an application for Academic Fresh Start, which may be obtained from the Counseling and Testing Center, CCEN 207, and send a transcript to the vice president for Student Affairs to be submitted for approval to the vice president for Academic Affairs. If the request is granted, the earlier course work will not count toward meeting requirements for graduation but would appear on the student’s transcript.

A student who plans to transfer to another institution should contact that institution to determine the impact of Academic Fresh Start prior to implementing the program at Walters State. If assistance is needed, a student should contact the vice president for Student Affairs.

Honors List

President’s List: 4.00 average for 12 or more semester hours per semester in regular college level work earned at WSCC.

Dean’s List: 3.50-3.99 average for 12 or more semester hours per semester in regular college level work earned at WSCC.

Graduation and Degree Requirements

Applications for graduation are processed through the department of Student Records. To be eligible for graduation and receive a degree or certificate from Walters State Community College, the student must have:

  1. Meet General Education Competency Requirement.
  2. Earned at least a GPA of 2.00 (“C” average in all studies attempted.)
  3. Fulfilled all courses required for the program as outlined in the college catalog, with 18 hours of the last 26 hours towards the degree being completed at Walters State Community College. For the Associate of Applied Science Degree program concentrations in Industrial Technology, students are required to take a minimum of 12 semester hours of technical course work at Walters State Community College.
  4. Filed an application for graduation and completed the graduation packet which can be secured in the department of Student Records. This must be completed on or before the deadline outlined in the college calendar. All applicants for graduation must have a minimum of 2.00 GPA at the time of filing an intent of graduation form in the Student Records Office.
  5. Paid the $25 graduation fee in the office of Business Affairs and informed the department of Student Records of such payment by showing a dated receipt. This payment is required of all degree and certificate graduates regardless of participation in the graduation ceremony. The fee includes the cost of the diploma. It must be paid at the beginning of the semester in which a student is schedule to graduate, is non-refundable and is valid for two semesters. However, the $25 fee for certificate graduations will only be assessed for the first certificate. The $25 fee will be waived for additional certificates.
  6. Resolved all obligations, financial or otherwise, to the college; and returned all library and college materials.

Other guidelines pertaining to graduation are:

  1. Students are allowed to graduate by meeting the requirements of the catalog under which they entered providing graduation is within seven years of the entrance. Degree requirements set forth in a catalog shall remain in effect for the duration of the period identified on the cover of this catalog. No guarantee is implied that these requirements will be contained in total or in part in future specification of the degree.
  2. Transfer credits used to satisfy Walters State’s degree requirements will not be averaged with the student’s grade point average at Walters State for the purpose of calculating the graduation average.
  3. Students may complete requirements for more than one option within the degree program by successfully completing all course requirements. There is no additional fee for this and no additional diplomas are awarded. Students may also complete requirements for more than one degree. A minimum of 16 credit hours beyond the requirements for the first degree must be completed. A $25 graduation fee must be paid for each separate degree, and a diploma will be awarded for the additional degree.
  4. Students graduating are required to take the Measure of Academic Proficiency Progress Examination. Notification as to testing dates will be provided. Students may also be required to take other tests as may be required by the institution.
  5. As part of the graduation requirements, prospective graduates must complete the graduate follow-up survey during the last semester of graduation. The follow-up survey can be delivered to Student Support Services (262-CCEN). This form must be completed or the application for graduation will be voided. All graduates within three to six months of graduation will be requested to complete a completer/leaver survey form. The return of this survey provides the college and the academic departments with information that is needed to keep all programs in compliance with TBR regulations. Further information may be obtained by visiting the department of Student Support Services in 262-CCEN.
  6. Students graduating in the fall, spring and summer semesters will attend the commencement exercises in May, unless special permission is granted by the department of Student Records. Students graduating at the end of the fall semester will be not receive their diploma until the commencement exercises but their permanent record will be posted as of the semester they graduate. Students completing graduation requirements at the end of the summer semester will receive their diploma in August.
  7. Walters State has one commencement ceremony per year which is at the end of the spring semester. Therefore, graduation honors are calculated at the end of the fall semester to be included in the graduation program, the graduation ceremony, and all news releases concerning graduation.

SPECIAL NOTE: Students who do not graduate by the semester which is indicated on application for graduation will have application voided and must reapply for graduation during another semester.

Graduation Honors

Awards and honors are based on the overall grade point average. Students graduating with the following quality point averages will receive the corresponding honor designations on their diplomas:

3.80 - 4.00 Summa Cum Laude  
3.50 - 3.79 Magna Cum Laude  
3.00 - 3.49 Cum Laude  

Misrepresentation of Credentials

It is a Class A misdemeanor to misrepresent academic credentials. A person commits the offense of misrepresentation of academic credentials who, knowing that the statement is false and with the intent to secure employment at or admission to an institution of higher education in Tennessee, represents, orally or in writing that such person:

  1. Has successfully completed the required course work for and has been awarded one (1) or more degrees or diplomas from an accredited institution of higher education;
  2. Has successfully completed the required course work for and has been awarded one (1) or more degrees or diplomas from a particular institution of higher education; or
  3. Has successfully completed the required course work for and has been awarded one (1) or more degree or diplomas in a particular field or specialty from an accredited institution of higher education.

Distance Education

Purpose

The office of Distance Education coordinates academic credit classes at off-campus centers, at satellite campuses and on the main campus during evening hours. These classes are consistent with the college’s overall mission to provide affordable, quality higher education opportunities for residents of upper East Tennessee. The Distance Education division strives to offer both accessible and flexible education within and beyond the traditional classroom. Classes, utilizing varying forms of delivery, provide lifelong learning to individuals seeking professional growth or personal enrichment in a society coping with rapidly changing life-styles.

Admission Requirements and Commitment to Instruction

Admission requirements for distance education students are identical with requirements for students in the regular daytime program. The quality of instruction governing credit courses offered during the evening on campus and at satellite locations is equivalent in all academic considerations to campus day classes.

In order to respond to community needs, the division of Distance Education welcomes suggestions and requests for arranging credit courses on campus during the evening or at off-campus locations. The office is located in Room 108A-CCEN, telephone 423-585-6899.

Evening Classes On-Campus

A variety of on-campus evening classes are offered as listed online at www.ws.edu. Evening classes are classes that begin at 4 p.m. or later.

Services available on campus during select hours each evening include those offered by the Student Information Office, the Counseling Center, the office of Business Affairs, the Library, the Student Success Center, and the Bookstore. The Distance Education office is open each evening until 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday on the days classes are in session.

Satellite Classes

Walters State specifically subscribes to the concept of accessibility by extending credit classes through satellite campuses and off-campus facilities as part of the delivery system. As a convenience to students, off-campus classes are organized and scheduled in locations conducive to enrollment. As a normal procedure, academic courses at satellite locations are listed by location online at www.ws.edu and are offered primarily during the evening hours. However, because of community response and local needs, off-campus courses are also available during the day at certain off-campus locations. In order to determine the availability of classes at off-campus locations, students are advised to examine closely the listings of classes by location.

Courses requiring laboratories, library materials, computers and other special resources are not offered off-campus unless the necessary resources are provided. To facilitate this scheduling, special arrangements are made for selected courses as needed. In addition, off-campus students may utilize the services of the R. Jack Fishman Library.

Claiborne County Center for Higher Education

Purpose

The Claiborne County Center for Higher Education serves as part of the college’s overall mission to provide leadership and academic opportunities to its entire service area, this extension offers day and evening academic credit classes and non-credit classes/training in cooperation with the Community Service Programs. Classes provide lifelong learning opportunities to individuals seeking to attain career and personal-development goals; consequently, these individuals are better-equipped to cope with the realities and problems arising from rapidly changing patterns of living and employment. To further its commitment to community responsiveness, the extension cooperates with other community agencies to provide training facilities for groups with specific needs. Video conference, video stream, and web-based courses along with face-to-face instructional delivery methods are utilized to bring a full range of classes to this rural area.

The Claiborne County Center is located at 907 Main Street in New Tazewell. The facility contains four general academic classrooms, a biology lab, computer science lab, an Educast classroom, administrative offices, and a student lounge area. General education courses as well as select technology courses are available to over 300 students.

Greeneville/Greene County Center for Higher Education

Purpose

The Greeneville/Greene County Center for Higher Education offers both credit and non-credit courses to the citizens of Greeneville and Greene County, as well as, the ten county service area of East Tennessee. In accordance with the mission of the college, the center responds to student and community educational needs by offering traditional on-campus classes, video-streaming courses, web-based courses, hybrid courses and regents on-line degree courses. These distance education and on-campus opportunities allow many students who are geographically remote from the main campus to take classes closer to their homes.

The WSCC Greeneville/Greene County Center strives to offer most of the courses in the general education core and many technical education courses for various degree and certificate programs. Courses are available to approximately 1,000 students and are offered during the day, evening, and on weekends. The facility includes general education classrooms, administrative and faculty offices, computer technology labs, chemistry and microbiology laboratories, an Educast room, student lounge areas, a media center, and an electronic library. In addition, the center is home for the Regional Police Academy, the Respiratory Care program, the Nursing program and provides space for East Tennessee State University and Adult Basic Education. Thirty-three full-time/part-time faculty/staff members are located at the center with additional faculty traveling from Morristown to the center. Additionally, over 30 adjunct faculty teach at the center each semester.

The campus is located at 215 North College Street in downtown Greeneville and was made available through the generous efforts of the governments of Greene County and the city of Greeneville, along with the Walters State Foundation. In January, 2006 the facility was acquired by the State of Tennessee. Local information can be obtained by calling 423-798-7940.

Sevier County Campus

Purpose

The Sevier County Campus seeks to promote lifelong learning, as part of the college’s overall mission, by responding to changing community needs and providing opportunities for enhancing the quality of life throughout the service area. Walters State’s campus, located in Sevierville, strives to offer all classes in the general education core and technical education courses during the day and evening for many degree and certificate programs. Additionally, the office of Community and Economic Development provides non-credit (CEU) classes/training to individuals seeking to attain career or personal development goals. Specialized programs in Culinary Arts, Hotel and Restaurant Management and Professional Entertainment are provided to address the unique educational needs of Sevier County and its surrounding communities.

The 67-acre Sevier County Campus is located at 1720 Old Newport Highway in Sevierville approximately one-half mile from Highway 411. Currently three buildings, made available through the generous support of the governmental bodies and private contributions of citizens in Sevier County, house a variety of general education and select technology courses. Available in Maples-Marshall Hall are general education classrooms, computer laboratories, science laboratories, a nursing skills laboratory and faculty and administrative offices. Classes in Allied Health, Public Safety, Natural Science and Computer Science and Information Technology are located in Maples-Marshall Hall. Cates-Cutshaw Hall houses 13 general education classrooms, two computer laboratories, a student study area, faculty, and administrative offices. Courses offered through the Behavioral/Social Science, Humanities, and Mathematics divisions are based in this building. The Conner-Short Center provides space for general education classes, professional entertainment, business, and culinary arts. This state-of-the-art facility has, in addition to general education classrooms, a dance studio, band room, private music practice rooms, a hot foods production kitchen, a demonstration kitchen, main dining room, student dining room, and administrative offices. Each of the buildings has the latest video streaming and instructional technology equipment in classrooms and public spaces. This campus serves over 1300 students per semester. Local information can be obtained by calling 865-774-5800.

Cocke County Extension

Courses offered are scheduled during the evening hours on the campuses of Cocke County High School and Ben Hooper Vocational School. Students desiring local information should call 423-585-6899.

Hawkins County Extension

Both general education and select technology courses are offered at various sites in Hawkins County. General education courses are offered during the evening hours while select technologies are offered both during the day and evening in order to meet community and industrial needs. Students desiring local information should call 423-585-6899.

Other Distance Learning Opportunities

In addition to the above specified sites, credit courses are also offered on a requested basis at other off-campus locations. Please reference the Walters State website at www.ws.edu.

The office of Distance Education also offers other learning opportunities for students who may not wish to travel to the main campus for all classes. Three types of distance learning opportunities, video conference, video stream, and web-based courses are currently offered.

Video conferencing courses follow traditional class meeting schedules, while providing students the opportunity to attend class sessions at one of three satellite centers (Greeneville, Sevierville, and New Tazewell) or at the main campus. The instructor can deliver instruction from any of the four sites to students at all locations. Students at the distance locations can see and interact with the instructor and students at other sites via closed circuit television technology. A variety of courses using this format are offered at the four sites listed above. Video conferencing courses are good choices for students who may be unable to travel to the main campus for a particular course.

Web-based courses offer students the opportunity to complete all or part of the work for a particular course via the Internet. These courses may follow a modified traditional class schedule or may meet only at selected times throughout the semester. To complete all requirements for these courses students must be able to access the Internet. Students may access the Internet through computer facilities at the college’s library on the main campus in Morristown or at the satellite campuses in Greeneville, Sevierville, and New Tazewell, or secure access on their own. The college is not responsible for obtaining or maintaining students’ individual equipment or software for accessing the Internet.

Hybrid courses combine traditional on-ground classes with web classes by dividing class time between traditional and online instruction. Students may utilize home computers or computer labs available on each Walters State campus to access instruction and to submit assignments. Hybrid classes are good choices for students who need to limit the number of trips to campus, but who also like having some face-to-face contact with classmates and the instructor.

Video Streaming courses - Live Video Streaming courses follow traditional class meeting schedules, while providing students the opportunity to attend class sessions at one of three satellite centers (Greeneville, Sevierville, and New Tazewell) or at the Morristown campus. Students at the distance locations can see and interact with the instructor and students at other sites via the Internet. Live Video Streaming courses are good choices for students who may be unable to travel to the main campus for a particular course. Video on Demand classes allow students to log onto taped classes at a time different than the live scheduled class meeting time and interact with the instructor and other students through email. On demand video streaming courses are good choices for students who may be unable to travel to a campus regularly for a particular course.

For more information about these distance learning opportunities, please reference the Walters State website at www.ws.edu or come by the office of Distance Education in room 108 of the Dr. Jack E. Campbell College Center, or call 423-585-6899. The office is open from 8 a.m. until 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. on Fridays while classes are in session. When classes are not in session, office hours are from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

R. Jack Fishman Library

Purpose

The Library is an integral component of Walters State Community College whose main purpose is to provide the learning resources and related services needed by our students and faculty. All students, particularly Regents Online Degree Program (RODP) students who are being taught by a Walters State instructor, will be provided access to the instructional materials needed to complete the course. This includes both electronic and print resources. The informational resource services are provided by a comprehensive state-of-the-art system utilizing the speed and flexibility of computerized networking and the Internet system to deliver these resources wherever they are needed in the Walters State service area. Secondary emphasis is placed on providing services to citizens residing in the college’s service area.

Located on the north end of the campus, the Library provides an atmosphere conducive for the pursuit of knowledge. The Library provides academic materials to the students and faculty which support and enrich the curriculum.

The staff of the Library provides orientation and professional consultation in the utilization of facilities and services. Assistance is provided to faculty, students and the community in the selection of books, periodicals, recordings, films and other related instructional materials. The Library has an Information Center which has been designated as an open academic lab for Walters State students. This lab is equipped with computer-related technology including academic software.

The Library provides to the students in a central location materials which will allow for alternative pathways to learning. To insure that the educational purposes and objectives are met, the Library strives to achieve the following:

  1. Provide students a place to pursue academic and leisure interests.
  2. Provide acacemic materials to the faculty and students.
  3. Provide assistance to the faculty in the selection of academic materials for educational programs.
  4. Provide bibliographic instructional programs emphasizing academic resources for the curriculum.
  5. Provide reference and advisory services to students and faculty working on Library-related academic research.
  6. Provide electronic access to academic materials to students and faculty on a 24/7 basis.
  7. Provide Internet access for students.
  8. Provide tutoring services in the Library in cooperation with the office of Student Tutoring.
  9. Provide the Catron Art Gallery for students and the community in cooperation with the Humanities division.

Information and Educational Technologies (IET)

The office of Information and Educational Technologies’ (IET) primary focus is to support academic and administrative areas of the college for all technology needs. IET is focused on providing superior consulting services and the latest technology for students, staff, and faculty. IET is comprised of three distinct ares that support Administrative Computing, Communication Services, and User Services. The directors and managers of these areas provide valuable expertise and direction to develop tools for the ever-changing learning environment. Students, faculty and staff are provided with the latest in personal computing technology hardware and software in order to prepare for career and workplace opportunities.

The Administrative Computing group supports the student, financial and human resource systems for the college. This group ensures that the necessary systems which provide support for students relating to registration, financial aid, and records are available and maintained appropriately. They also support all aspects of the financial services for the college as well as all functions relating to human resources.

The Communication Services group provides support for all infrastructure technology services. This includes network and Internet access, student and employee (staff and faculty) e-mail, telephone systems, closed circuit television system, distance learning resources, audio and video conferencing services, web design and web services, and oversight of the ELEARN web-based course environment. Additionally, the institution offers full coverage wireless access so students can access online instruction from almost any location on all of our campuses. This group leads the institution’s efforts to provide the latest multimedia instructional technology. This includes smart rooms and Educast rooms for instructional purposes as well as video conferencing and webcasts. This allows students to plan and customize their course work to save time, travel, and money.

The User Services group provides direct services to the campus community and is the first point of contact for all technology needs. The User Services group maintains the technology Helpdesk and ensures that issues are resolved quickly and effectively. This group also monitors and oversees the daily operations of the closed-circuit television system and distance learning monitoring system. The college has over 50 smart classrooms and seven distance learning video conference classrooms that User Services manages on a daily basis, as well as 35 computer labs. Additionally, staff members maintain and assist with many community-related special events. Our video specialists are responsible for producing quality video media presnetations including, but not limited to, public relations announcements, athletic and college-sponsored video productions, conference and educational presentations, and public and community announcements.

University Parallel Programs

Associate of Arts, Associate of Science in Teaching and Associate of Science Degrees

Articulation and Transfer

Students who intend to earn a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree at a four-year college or university may complete the first two years at Walters State by enrolling in the Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree programs. The administration, faculty, and staff at Walters State work closely with the student and neighboring colleges and universities to help ensure smooth and accurate transfer. Course-by-course equivalency tables and articulation agreements with some four-year colleges and universities have been developed to ease transfer and assist the student and advisor with academic program development. For more information visit the Walters State web page at www.ws.edu. Students following an articulation agreement with East Tennessee State University, Carson Newman College, Lincoln Memorial University, or the University of Tennessee-Knoxville must complete the Intent to Articulate Form in the department of Counseling and Testing and must graduate from Walters State Community College in order to have the agreement honored. Students should consult with their advisors, the Counseling Center at Walters State, or with the transfer institution for more information.If no program articulation agreement is available for a particular school or major, students may choose to follow one of the university parallel cur-riculum guides (Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree programs.) These “guides” are suggested courses of study designed to include general education and foundation courses needed for a major in a particular field at the baccalaureate level. Because each school has different requirements, the curriculum guides are not intended to represent requirements for any particular college or university. Students should consult a copy of the catalog of the senior institution to which they plan to transfer and use it during advisement and registration to make sure that the courses selected meet the first two years’ requirements at that institution. Substitutions to meet requirements at a specific institution may be requested through the advisor provided the requirements for the Associate of Arts or the Associate of Science degrees are met.All Walters State students are advised and encouraged to complete the associate degree prior to continuing their education elsewhere.

General Education Core Requirements

Effective Fall Semester 2004, each institution in the State University and Community College System of Tennessee (The Tennessee Board of Regents System) will share a common lower-division general education core curriculum of forty-one (41) semester hours for baccalaureate degrees and the Associate of Arts and the Associate of Science degrees. Lower-division means freshman and sophomore courses. The courses comprising the general education curriculum are contained within the following subject categories:

Associate of Arts and Associate of Science Degrees and Baccalaureate Degrees*

Communication 9 hours **
Humanities and/or Fine Arts (at least one course must be in literature) 9 hours
Social/Behavioral Sciences 6 hours
History 6 hours ***
Natural Sciences 8 hours
Mathematics 3 hours
Total 41 hours

Associate of Science in Teaching

Communication
  ENGL 1010 - Honors English Composition I 
ENGL 1020 - Honors English Composition II 
SPCH 2010 - Introduction to Speech Communication (CC) 
Humanities and/or Fine Arts
  MUS 1030♦ - Music Appreciation 
or
ART 1030♦ - Art Appreciation 
Approved Humanities General Education elective
Approved Literature General Education elective
History
  HIST 2010♦ - American History I 
or
HIST 2020♦ - American History II 
or
HIST 2030♦ - Tennessee History 
Behavioral/Social Sciences
  GEOG 1013 - World Geography I 
or
POLI 1120 - Introduction to American Government 
or
SOCI 1020 - General Sociology, Institutions and Society 
Mathematics
  MATH 1530♦ - Probability and Statistics (CC) 
Natural Science
  BIOL 1030 - Concepts of Biology  and BIOL 1031 - Concepts of Biology Lab 
CHEM 1030 - Concepts of Chemistry  and CHEM 1031 - Concepts of Chemistry Lab 
Total 41 hours

*Foreign language courses are an additional requirement for the Associate of Arts (A.A.) and Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degrees. The B.A. degree requires proficiency in a foreign language equivalent to completion of two years of college-level work. The A.A. degree requires proficiency in a foreign language equivalent to completion of one year of college-level work.

**Six hours of English Composition and three hours in English oral presentational communication are required.

***Students who plan to transfer to Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) universities should take six hours of United States History (three hours of Tennessee History may substitute). Students who plan to transfer to University of Tennessee System universities or to out-of-state or private universities should check requirements and take the appropriate courses.

Although the courses designated by Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) institutions to fulfill the requirements of the general education subject categories vary, transfer of the courses is assured through the following means:

  • Upon completion of an A.A., A.S. or A.S.T. degree, the requirements of the lower-division general education core will be complete and accepted by a TBR university in the transfer process.
  • If an A.A., A.S. or A.S.T. is not obtained, transfer of general education courses will be based upon fulfillment of complete subject categories. (Example: If all eight hours in the category of Natural Sciences are complete, then this “block” of the general education is complete.) When a subject category is incomplete, course-by-course evaluation will be conducted. The provision of block fulfillment pertains also to students who transfer among TBR universities.
  • Institutional/departmental requirements of the grade of “C” will be honored. Even if credit is granted for a course, any specific requirements for the grade of “C” by the receiving institution will be enforced. Additionally, A.S.T. graduates must attain a 2.75 cumulative grade point average, successfully complete the Praxis I, score a satisfactory rating on an index of suitability for the teaching profession.
  • In certain majors, specific courses must be taken also in general education. It is important that students and advisors be aware of any major requirements that must be fulfilled under lower-division general education.

Courses designated to fulfill general education by Walters State Community College are published on page 56 of this catalog. A complete listing of the courses fulfilling general education requirements for all system institutions is available on the TBR website www.tbr.state.tn.us under Transfer and Articulation Information.

*Programs in Natural Science and Mathematics may have more than forty-one (41) general education hours due to specific program requirements.

 

Associate of Applied Science and Academic/Technical Certificate Programs

Walters State offers associate of applied science degree and academic/technical certificate programs which prepare students for a specialized career. These programs are designed for the student who desires to enter employment upon graduation and does not intend to transfer to a baccalaureate degree program.

Associate of Applied Science

Associate of Applied Science degree programs are designed to prepare students for immediate employment in a specialized area.

  1. All component requirements are outcome oriented.
  2. Degree major requirements are composed of a minimum of 60 semester credit hours.
  3. The technical speciality component of the  technical degree major consists of a minimum of 36 semester credit hours.
  4. Minimum requirements as stipulated by the Tennessee Board of Regents and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools are that each technical degree program contain 15-17 semester credit hours of general education. Each technical degree program at Walters State contains a minimum of 15 hours in general education courses.

Academic/Technical Certificate

Programs leading to academic/technical certificates are offered in response to the various training needs of business and industry. Program standards are determined primarily by the training needs of business and industry and depict skill proficiency in a particular employment area.

Notes

  • See General Education courses.
  • A student interested in transferring to a baccalaureate degree program should see an advisor at Walters State and/or contact the appropriate department at the transfer institution for specifics. A student admitted to a technical education program is not required to complete high school units of study required for the student who plans to attend a university. If a technical degree program student later decides to attend a state university, the high school deficiencies must be made up prior to being admitted to the university.
  • Credit hours earned in remedial or developmental education courses are institutional credit; they are not applicable to credit hours required for an associate degree or academic/technical certificate.


General Education


Statement of Purpose

Walters State Community College requires a core of general education courses as part of each degree program. The purpose of general education is to provide students with a common set of learning experiences as a foundation for:

  • solving problems of everyday life,
  • participating intelligently in civic affairs,
  • preparing for jobs, vocations, or professions and
  • recognizing major elements of human culture.

What students need to know and be able to do to function in an increasingly technological workplace and in everyday life has its basis in both competencies and areas of understanding as a preparation for lifelong learning.

Competencies

Students completing the general education core will minimally demonstrate competencies in each of the following areas:

  1. The ability to read effectively, to differentiate one’s personal opinions from a writer’s, and to develop a functional vocabulary;
  2. The ability to write clear, coherent, well developed, appropriately organized, and grammatically correct arguments that include the research skills of gathering, analyzing, interpreting, and transmitting information;
  3. The ability to communicate orally through informing, persuading, listening and relating to others in a clear, concise, and grammatically correct manner;
  4. The ability to analyze/discuss/and use quantitative information, demonstrate a reasonable level of facility in mathematical problem solving and recognize connections between mathematics and other disciplines;
  5. The ability to use the information technologies including word processing, graphical presentation, electronic communication and information gathering.

Areas of Understanding

Walters State Community College graduates will demonstrate a general understanding of the relationships between the various areas of academic study. In addition to the competencies referenced earlier, WSCC graduates will have:

  • Acquired scientific and mathematical ways of thinking necessary for informed decision making;
  • Developed through the multiple perspectives of different academic disciplines a perception of self in a social-historical and multicultural context;
  • Developed an appreciation of beauty in nature, in literature, in music, and in other art forms;
  • Recognized the value and dignity of being human, making ethical decisions, and behaving as responsible citizens and community members in a democratic society, and;
  • Improved abilities of critical thinking, problem solving, higher order thinking and reasoning.

 

General Education Courses


Associate of Arts (A.A.) and Associate of Science (A.S.) Degrees


   
Communication 9 hours *
Humanities and/or Fine Arts 9 hours **
Social/Behavioral Sciences 6 hours
History 6 hours ***
Natural Sciences 8 hours
Mathematics 3 hours
  Total 41 hours

* Six (6) hours of English composition and three (3) hours in English oral presentational communication are required.

**One course in literature is required.

***Students who plan to transfer to Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) universities should take six (6) hours of American History (three hours of Tennessee History may substitute). Students who plan to transfer to University of Tennessee System universities or to out-of-state or private universities should check requirements and take the appropriate courses.

Foreign language courses will be an additional requirement for the Associate of Arts and the Bachelor of Arts degrees.

Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degrees


   
English Composition 3 hours
Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 hours ****
Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 hours ****
Natural Science/Mathematics 3 hours ****
One additional course from the categories of:**** 3-4 hours
  Communication, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Social/Behavioral Sciences, or Natural Science/Mathematics  
Total 15-17 hours

****Specific courses satisfying these requirements must be the same courses that satisfy the general education requirement for the associate (A.A./A.S.) and Baccalaureate degrees.

Associate of Science Teaching (A.S.T.) Degree


Approved Humanities General Education elective 3 hours
Approved Literature General Education elective 3 hours

Note(s):


 

Associate of Arts/ Associate of Science degree programs are designed for the student who desires to transfer to a four-year institution to pursue a baccalaureate degree. The information presented in a university parallel curriculum is not intended to represent requirements for any particular college or university. Students should consult articulation agreements, the catalog of the school to which they intend to transfer and their advisors for information on degree requirements.

Associate of Science in Teaching is a jointly developed degree through the TBR community colleges. Currently, students in the community colleges follow articulation agreements worked out with nearby four-year teacher preparation colleges. With the A.S.T., students will be able to enroll in any TBR teacher education program. Students intending to transfer to the UT system or private institutions should consult a faculty advisor on the appropriateness of this program for transfer.

Associate of Applied Science and Academic/Technical Certificate programs are designed for the student who desires to enter employment upon graduation and does not intend to transfer to a baccalaureate degree program. A student admitted to an Associate of Applied Science program is not required to complete high school units of study required for admission to a university. However, should the student later decide to attend a state university, the requirements must be completed prior to admission to a baccalaureate program.

See an advisor for assistance in planning your academic program.

General Education Competency Requirements

For associate degree graduates, college level competencies in general education core areas are assessed by one of the methods listed below by the time the student earns 30 hours of college credit towards a degree at Walters State Community College.

NOTE: Students may meet competencies using a combination of the methods listed.

a.) Pass all competency requirements embedded in Walters State Core Competency (CC) courses ENGL 1010, SPCH 2010, MATH 1530, or MATH 1630 or MATH 1710 and CPSC 1100, or MGMT 1100. If courses are taken at Walters State, competency is assessed and documented within the courses. If courses are transferred in, students have the option to meet the college level competency requirement by taking end of Core Competency course assessments.

OR

b) Achieve a score that meets or exceeds a national norm or college level competency score on one of the following assessments.
 

General Education Competency Assessments Requirements

 

 

Reading

Writing

Math  

Information Technology

ACT

18

27

24

n/a

SAT

n/a

500

500

n/a

CLEP

n/a

English 50

College Algebra 50; Calculus 50

n/a

AP

n/a

English Language Comp 3

Calculus AB 3

n/a

Computer Competency Exam

 ——-

———————-

————————–

80%

Nationally Normed, Criterion Referenced General Education Assessment Currently MAPP

 

Proficient at

Level 3

 

Proficient at

 Level 3

 

Proficient at

 Level 3

n/a

 

OR

 

c) Possess an associate’s or higher degree from a regionally accredited institution.

 

Computer Competency Requirement
 

Walters State Community College is committed to the importance of computer competency. The college requires all degree-seeking students to demonstrate computer competency either by passing an exam or by successfully completing a designated computer course.

During the first thirty (30) hours of college-level course work at Walters State, students will discuss with their advisor the requirements in their major for proving computer competency. The advisor will determine which steps a student should follow to show proof of computer competency. For specific information, students can access the WSCC website www.ws.edu and click on the “computer competency” page.

Walters State Online Courses

Walters State offers the A.S. General degree on-line. Many other courses required to complete the Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), and Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees at Walters State can be taken as web based courses as a part of the college’s web-based courses. Web-based courses offer students the opportunity to complete all or part of the work for a particular course via the Internet. These courses may follow a modified traditional class schedule or may meet only at selected times throughout the semester. Some courses may not require any on-campus meetings. To complete all requirements for these courses, students must be able to access the Internet. Students may access the Internet through computer facilities at the college’s library on the Morristown campus or at the satellite campuses in Greeneville, Sevierville, and New Tazewell, or secure access on their own. The college is not responsible for obtaining or maintaining students’ individual equipment or software for accessing the Internet. A list of web based courses offered for a particular semester and required on-campus meeting schedules can be accessed at online.ws.edu.

The Regents On-Line Degree Program

Beginning Fall 2001, the Tennessee Board of Regents colleges and universities joined together in offering Regents On-line Degree Programs (RODP). Courses completed in the Regents On-line Degree Programs will be entirely on-line and will be completely transferable among all the participating institutions which are fully accredited.

Walters State Community College joins with the other Tennessee Board of Regents institutions in offering the Regents On-line Degree Program (ROPD). The five on-line degrees offered by Walters State are:

Associate of Applied Science in Professional Studies Concentration in Information Technology

Associate of Applied Science in Web Technology

Associate of Applied Science in Early Childhood Education

Associate of Arts in General Studies (University Parallel)

Associate of Science in General Studies (University Parallel)

Associate of Science in General Studies (University Parallel) for Teacher Aides and Paraprofessionals

For specific program information go to: http://www.rodp.org

Academic Enrichment

Purpose

The office of Academic Enrichment provides administration and leadership for the college’s developmental education program and honors program relative to meeting the institution’s stated mission. These programs are guided in meeting the special academic needs of its student constituency by a well-defined statement of purpose consistent with the overall mission of the college.


Developmental Education


The Developmental Education program provides assistance to students in developing those academic and social skills necessary for the successful completion of college work. Courses and activities are designed for students who lack minimum skills, as defined by the Tennessee Board of Regents, in reading comprehension, writing communication, mathematical computation, and study skills. Services provided include academic assessment, academic placement, and counseling-related programs and activities. This division is decentralized and integrated throughout the academic and student affairs units.

Mathematics Program


The Developmental Mathematics program, a part of the Mathematics Division, assists students in developing the ability to perform mathematical computations, use measurements, make estimates and approximations, judge reasonableness of results, formulate and solve mathematical problems, select appropriate approaches and problem-solving tools, and use elementary concepts of probability and statistics. Developmental Mathematics courses are intended for students who need additional preparation in mathematics prior to enrolling in college level courses. These courses are not intended for transfer nor do they satisfy degree-credit requirements for any associate degree or technical certificate program. Some special admissions, registration, and retention policies apply to the Developmental Education program. Students are encouraged to seek additional information about these policies from the office of Academic Enrichment, 201-CCEN, 423-585-6914.

Developmental Mathematics (DSPM)


The following is a listing of Developmental Mathematics (DSPM) courses. Please refer to page 154 for a complete listing of course descriptions and credit hours.

Reading Program


The Developmental Reading program, a part of the Humanities Division, assists students in developing the ability to read effectively, recognize different purposes and methods of writing, differentiate personal opinions and assumptions from a writer’s, use texts and reference materials, and develop a functional college-level vocabulary. Developmental Reading courses are intended to help students develop the ability to read effectively at a level necessary to successfully complete college level studies. These courses are not intended for transfer nor do they satisfy degree-credit requirements for any associate degree or technical certificate program. Some special admissions, registration and retention policies apply to the Developmental Education program. Students are encouraged to seek additional information about these policies from the office of Academic Enrichment, 201-CCEN, 423-585-6914.

Developmental Reading (DSPR)


The following is a listing of Developmental Reading (DSPR) courses. Please refer to page 167 for a complete listing of course descriptions and credit hours.

Note


Sections with the suffix ESL (English as a Second Language) are for students whose native language is not English. These sections will stress idiomatic language through exercises and listening as well as speaking.

Writing Program


The Developmental Writing program, a part of the Humanities Division, assists students in developing the ability to write effectively utilizing standard English, vary writing style, and improve the ability to gather information. Developmental writing courses are intended for students who need additional preparation in writing and spelling prior to enrolling in college level courses using these skills. These courses are not intended for transfer nor do they satisfy degree-credit requirements for any associate degree or technical certificate program. Some special admissions, registration, and retention policies apply to the Developmental Education program. Students are encouraged to seek additional information about these policies from the office of Academic Enrichment, 201-CCEN, 423-585-6914.

Developmental Writing (DSPW)


The following is a listing of Developmental Writing (DSPW) courses. Please refer to page 141 for a complete listing of course descriptions and credit hours.

Note


Sections with the suffix ESL (English as a Second Language) are for students whose native language is not English. These sections will stress idiomatic language through exercises and listening as well as speaking.

English as a Second Language (ESL)


  1. As a result of tests and interviews, non-native English speakers will be placed in the appropriate ESL writing, reading, and language laboratory sections and other classes. The core 9-hour program is required of all beginning ESL students.
  2. ESL students enrolled in 0700 reading and writing courses are limited to the core courses until satisfactory completion. However, ESL students enrolled in 0800 level writing and/or reading classes may begin their math sequence and the required study skills course.
  3. Students enrolled in 0800 level writing courses may take, in addition to study skills and math classes, any of the following courses.
  4. Students will be allowed to enroll in other college level courses only upon successful completion of DSPW 0800 plus any other required developmental courses and passing the TOEFL.

 

Learning Strategies Program


The Learning Strategies program, a part of the Behavioral/Social Science Division, assists students in the development of multiple study skills including setting goals and priorities, following schedules, locating and using resources external to the classroom, using general special vocabularies for reading, writing, speaking, listening, computing, and note taking. The program focuses attention on learning to utilize college resources, test-taking, and facilitating abilities of recall. These courses are not intended for transfer nor do they satisfy degree-credit requirements for any associate degree or academic/technical certificate program. Some special admissions, registration, and retention policies apply to the Developmental Education program. Students are encouraged to seek additional information about these policies from the office of Academic Enrichment, 201-CCEN, 423-585-6914.

Assessment, Testing, Orientation, Counseling, and Retention


The Assessment, Testing, Orientation, and Counseling program is a part of the organizational areas of Counseling and Testing and Student Information. The program identifies students deficient in one or more of the areas of reading, English, or mathematics; assesses appropriate students for placement and for counseling-related services for academic and personal guidance, vocational, developmental, transitional, career, and/or emotional concerns.

The office of the program director provides a broad range of academic and student services. Additionally, the office of the program director provides research for program decision-making, reporting retention and enrollment data, monitoring developmental education class attendance, and monitoring college-wide student retention.

Honors Program

The purpose of the Honors Program is to enhance the highest level opportunities of academic excellence by providing an enriched curriculum and educational experience for superior students desiring to intensify their academic pursuits. Honor students will experience the highest level of academic challenge and quality from dedicated faculty who share a commitment of excellence in teaching and service.

Acceptance in the Honors Program - Terms and Conditions

To be accepted and to maintain good standing in the Walters State Campus Honors Program, a student must have an ACT composite score of 24 and complete the honors core program. Students who are 21 years of age or older without an ACT composite of 24 may submit both a score of 68 or above on the writing portion and a 50 or above on the algebra portion of the Computer Placement Assessment and Support System (COMPASS) in place of the ACT. After one or more semesters at Walters State, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 in 12 or more college-level hours may apply.

Honors Course Requirement

Successfully complete a total of 18 Honors credits including the Honors required courses or equivalent.

Grade Point Average

Maintain a 3.25 cumulative grade point average (GPA) per year and earn a 2.8 or higher in any one term. Grades are monitored after each term.

Additional information may be obtained in the office of Academic Enrichment, 201-CCEN or call 423-585-6914.