Feb 18, 2020  
2016-2017 Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
2016-2017 Catalog and Student Handbook [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 In addition to the credit courses of study in each of the following disciplines, the college also offers from semester to semester various special courses of study not listed. These courses are offered through the office of Community Education and all inquiries should be addressed to the dean of that office.

♦ Courses with this designation will transfer to some four year colleges and universities. Please see transfer equivalency tables, the Walters State Student Success Center or your faculty advisor for more specifics on the transferability of coursework.

Course Designations

F - course offered Fall Semester

S - course offered Spring Semester

Su - course offered Summer Semester

As required - offered on student need

 
  
  •  

    ETMF 2710 - Operations Management II

    3 credit(s)

    A study of the Toyota Production System with topics including Lean Manufacturing, JIT, KanBan, Agile, Flexible Manufacturing, Facilities Planning and Work Standards. Prerequisite(s): All Learning Support mathematics courses or consent of instructor. F
    3 hours lecture
  
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    ETMF 2720/2721 - Facilities Planning

    3 credit(s)

    Work methods analysis and planning for the functions of the storage and retrieval of production materials and supplies. This study looks at the uses of facilities planning in the reduction of labor costs associated with production, and the analysis of material flow within the facility. Additional topics include the economical selection of material handling and storage equipment and determining adequate space allocation for the functions of manufacturing, testing, and inspection of the product. In addition, the use of computerized facility planning software systems will be explored and evaluated during the course. Prerequisite(s): ETDD 1010, ETMF 2610, ETMF 2710 and completion of all Learning Support mathematics courses or consent of instructor S
    2 hours lecture / 2 hours laboratory
  
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    ETMF 2740/2741 - Industrial Measurement and Cost Systems

    3 credit(s)

    A study of work methods and analysis for improvement to reduce labor, content, process analysis and approaches to problem solving. This course includes the gathering of data through the use of time studies, pre-determined time standards, an introduction to methods-time-management (MTM), and establishing a work sampling study utilizing random observations. This data is then analyzed for application to cost reduction and improved efficiency. The various forms of wage plans are also discussed concerning the advantages and disadvantages of each. Included are the study and use of financial and analytical methodologies for the determination of equipment purchases, lease, or rental replacement frequencies and/or justifications. A study of economics as utilized by engineering departments, for equipment selection, decision making, analysis of data, and the time-value of money. Prerequisite(s): ETMF 1010 and completion of all Learning Support mathematics courses or consent of instructor F
    2 hours lecture / 2 hours laboratory
  
  •  

    ETMF 2750 - Engineering Economy

    3 credit(s)

    An economic study of manufacturing. Amortization, cash flow, rates of return, depreciation, present work analyses, time value of money, capital recovery and tax implications, and cost estimation. S
  
  •  

    ETMF 2810/2811 - CNC Programming

    3 credit(s)

    A study of the capabilities, programming procedures, advantages and disadvantages of numerical control (N/C) and computerized numerical control (CNC) metal working machine tools. Manual methods for generating, debugging and running point-to-point and continuous path programs including linear and circular interpolation, canned cycles, loops, and subroutines to produce work pieces of increasing complexity. Manual methods for generating, debugging and operating robotic equipment will also be covered. Pre/Corequisite(s): ETMF 1210, ETMF 2200 or permission of instructor As required
    2 hours lecture / 2 hours laboratory
  
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    ETMF 2990 - Special Problems in Manufacturing

    1-6 credit(s)

    This course allows the student additional advanced studies in a particular area of interest to the student or which are in demand by local industry. This course may be repeated for credit provided the same subject matter is not used. Prerequisite(s): The student must have prior approval of the instructor before registering for this course As required
  
  •  

    FIRE 1310 - Principles of Emergency Services

    3 credit(s)

    This course provides an overview to fire protection and emergency services; career opportunities in fire protection and related fields; culture and history of emergency services; fire loss analysis; organization and function of public and private fire protection services; fire departments as part of local government; laws and regulations affecting the fire service; fire service nomenclature; specific fire protection functions; basic fire chemistry and physics; introduction to fire protection systems; introduction to fire strategy and tactics; life safety initiatives. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
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    FIRE 1315 - Rescue Awareness

    3 credit(s)

    Basic methods of recognition and identification of a hazardous situation where a rescuer might be overwhelmed by the magnitude of the problem. Utilizing all known resources in the perspective area, and focusing in on personal safety and patient safety. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
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    FIRE 1320 - Principles of Fire and Emergency Services Safety and Survival

    3 credit(s)

    This course introduces the basic principles and history related to the national firefighter life safety initiatives, focusing on the need for cultural and behavior change throughout the emergency services. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
  •  

    FIRE 1325 - Fire Investigation I

    3 credit(s)

    This course is intended to provide the student with the fundamentals and technical knowledge needed for proper fire scene interpretations, including recognizing and conducting origin and cause, preservation of evidence and documentation, scene security, motives of the fire setter, and types of fire causes. Prerequisite(s): FIRE 1310, FIRE 2320, FIRE 2330, or instructor approved. Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
  •  

    FIRE 1330 - Fire Prevention

    3 credit(s)

    Course provides fundamental knowledge relating to the field of fire prevention. Topics include: history and philosophy of fire prevention; organization and operation of a fire prevention bureau; use and application of codes and standards; plans review; fire inspections; fire and safety education; and fire investigation. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
  •  

    FIRE 2115 - Introduction to Homeland Security and Disaster Management

    3 credit(s)

    This course will provide students with an overview of the concepts of homeland security and emergency management at the local (operational) level as well as the national (strategic) level. This is a writing and discussion intensive course to develop the knowledge skills and abilities needed for homeland security/emergency managers for the future. F, S
  
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    FIRE 2170 - Public Fire and Life Safety Education

    3 credit(s)

    This course is designed to provide the public and/or fire service educator with the knowledge and skills needed to successfully perform as a fire and life safety educator as addressed in NFPA 1035. The topics include fire behavior, community assessment, injury prevention and juvenile fire-setting. The student will also develop presentation skills and learn how to formulate public education programs. An overview of the educator, manager, and administrator role will be presented. F, S
  
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    FIRE 2180 - Legal Aspects of Emergency Services

    3 credit(s)

    This course will address the federal, state, and local laws that regulate emergency services. It will also include a review of national standards, regulations, and consensus standards that emergency services are measured against. Prerequisite(s): FIPT 1110, 1020, 1090, 2010, 2020, 2220 F, S
  
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    FIRE 2185 - Fire Investigation II

    3 credit(s)

    This course is intended to provide the student with advanced technical knowledge on the role of law, fire scene analysis, fire behavior, evidence collection and preservation, scene documentation, case preparation and courtroom testimony. Prerequisite(s): FIPT 1110, FIPT 2010, FIPT 2200, FIPT 2120 and FIPT 1020 or in rare circumstance students may receive permission of instructor. F, S
  
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    FIRE 2199 - Special Topics in Fire Science

    1 credit(s)

    Study and discussion of select topics in the field of fire science. Content may vary. The course may be repeated with departmental consent. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
  •  

    FIRE 2299 - Special Topics in Fire Science

    2 credit(s)

    Study and discussion of select topics in the field of fire science. Content may vary. The course may be repeated with departmental consent. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
  •  

    FIRE 2310 - Fire Protection Systems

    3 credit(s)

    Provide information relating to the features of design and operation of fire alarm systems, water-based fire suppression systems, special hazard fire suppression systems, water supply for fire protection and portable fire extinguishers. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
  •  

    FIRE 2315 - Introduction to Homeland Security and Disaster Management

    3 credit(s)

    This course will provide students with an overview of the concepts of homeland security and emergency management at the local (operational) level as well as the national (strategic) level. This is a writing and discussion intensive course to develop the knowledge skills and abilities needed for homeland security/emergency managers for the future. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
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    FIRE 2320 - Building Construction for Fire Protection

    3 credit(s)

    Provide the components of building construction that relate to fire and life safety. The focus of this course is on firefighter and life safety. The elements of construction and design of structures are show to be key factors when inspecting buildings, preplanning fire operations, and operating at emergencies. Prerequisite(s): FIRE 1310 or instructor approval. Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
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    FIRE 2325 - Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply

    3 credit(s)

    Course provides a foundation of theoretical knowledge in order to understand the principles of the use of water in fire protection and to apply hydraulic principles to analyze and to solve water supply problems. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
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    FIRE 2330 - Fire Behavior and Combustion

    3 credit(s)

    This course explores the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread, and how they are controlled. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
  •  

    FIRE 2335 - Strategy and Tactics

    3 credit(s)

    Course provides the principles of fire ground control through utilization of personnel equipment, and extinguishing agents. Prerequisite(s): FIRE 1310 and completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
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    FIRE 2340 - Leadership Development

    3 credit(s)

    Presenting the company officer with the basic leadership skills and behaviors needed to perform effectively in the fire service environment. The course includes problem-solving skills and behaviors, identify and assess the needs of the company officer’s subordinates and decision making skills for the company officer. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing or instructor approval. As needed.
  
  •  

    FIRE 2350 - Principles of Fire and Emergency Services Administration

    3 credit(s)

    The course introduces the student to the organization and management of a fire and emergency services department and the relationship of government agencies to the fire service. Emphasis is placed on fire and emergency services, ethics, and leadership from the perspective of the company officer. Prerequisite(s): FIRE 1310 or instructor approval. Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing or instructor approval. As needed.
  
  •  

    FIRE 2355 - Hazardous Materials I

    3 credit(s)

    Basic methods of recognition and identification of hazardous materials based on the chemical and physical properties of hazardous materials and the basic safety procedures when utilizing specific types of protective equipment. Discussion includes the basic tactical concerns relating to scene management of a hazardous material incident. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
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    FIRE 2360 - Occupational Safety and Health for Emergency Services

    3 credit(s)

    This course introduces the basic concepts of occupational health and safety as it relates to emergency service organizations. Topics include risk evaluation and control procedures for emergency service organizations. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
  •  

    FIRE 2365 - Hazardous Materials II

    3 credit(s)

    A continuing study of hazardous materials. Emphasis will be placed on hazard and risk assessment and site control. Discussion will include standard operating procedures and termination of an incident as well as advanced control techniques. Prerequisite(s): FIRE 1325, FIRE 1310, FIRE 2320, FIRE 2330, and completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
  •  

    FIRE 2370 - Public Fire and Life Safety Education

    3 credit(s)

    This course is designed to provide the public and/or fire service educator with the knowledge and skills needed to successfully perform as a fire and life safety educator as addressed in NFPA 1035. The topics include fire behavior, community assessment, injury prevention and juvenile fire-setting. The student will also develop presentation skills and learn how to formulate public education programs. An overview of the educator, manager, and administrator role will be presented. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
  •  

    FIRE 2375 - Hazardous Materials Chemistry

    3 credit(s)

    Course provides basic chemistry relating to the categories of hazardous materials including recognition, identification, reactivity, and health hazards encountered by emergency services. This course is not intended to satisfy the natural science requirement for the AAS degree. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
  •  

    FIRE 2380 - Legal Aspects of Emergency Services

    3 credit(s)

    This course will address the federal, state, and local laws that regulate emergency services. It will also include a review of national standards, regulations, and consensus standards that emergency services are measured against. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
  •  

    FIRE 2385 - Fire Investigation II

    3 credit(s)

    This course is intended to provide the student with advanced technical knowledge on the rule of law, fire scene analysis, fire behavior, evidence collection and preservation, scene documentation, case preparation and courtroom testimony. Prerequisite(s): FIRE 1325, FIRE 1310, FIRE 2320, FIRE 2330, and completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
  •  

    FIRE 2390 - Emergency Services Capstone Project

    3 credit(s)

    Research paper in APA format on contemporary issues or problems within the fire and emergency services field; written report required; findings may be applied in work environment. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing and successful completion of FIRE 1310, FIRE 1320, FIRE 1330, FIRE 2310, FIRE 2320, and FIRE 2330. As needed.
  
  •  

    FIRE 2399 - Special Topics in Fire Science

    3 credit(s)

    Study and discussion of select topics in the field of fire science. Content may vary. The course may be repeated with departmental consent. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all Learning Support competencies in Reading and Writing. As needed.
  
  •  

    FREN 1010♦ - Elementary French I

    3 credit(s)

    An elementary course in the essentials of French with a strong video emphasis. This course provides the opportunity for students to experience , via video, the richness and diversity of the French language, culture and people. Stress is placed upon listening, speaking, reading, writing and culture. The process of oral communication will be highlighted, including how to initiate and continue a conversation in French for a few minutes using vocabulary related to, but not limited to, greetings, the classroom, physical attributes, pastimes and family members. F
  
  •  

    FREN 1020♦ - Elementary French II

    3 credit(s)

    A continuation of French 1010 with a more profound study of the grammar and essentials of the language. Idiomatic expressions will be stressed in order to create more native-like spoken and written language. Prerequisite(s): FREN I or 1 year of high school French S
  
  •  

    FREN 2010♦ - Intermediate French

    3 credit(s)

    This course is an in depth study of the French language and culture. It is designed to prepare students with practical skills to express themselves both orally and in writing in interpersonal or small group communications. Special emphasis will be placed upon mastery of grammatical structures. Various nuances with verb tense and moods will be covered in an effort to produce more native-like language. Students will develop the ability to initiate and continue a conversation in French for 3-5 minutes. Prerequisite(s): FREN 1010 and 1020 or 2 years of high school French F
  
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    FREN 2020♦ - Intermediate French II

    3 credit(s)

    A continuation of French 2010 with an extensive study of grammar and the essentials of the language. Emphasis is to fine tune students’ skills in order for them to be able to communicate freely in various non-structured environments. Prerequisite(s): FREN 1010, 1020 and 2010 or 3 years of high school French S
  
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    GEOG 1000♦ - Area Studies

    3 credit(s)

    This course is a prerequisite to college level geography. It is designed for students who have not had high school social studies. The student must maintain a grade of C or better and will receive elective credit only. The course is designed to instill in students a sense of place. It is orientated toward a study of the location of countries, important mountain ranges, bodies of water, and climates around the world. It will also include a treatment of cultural diversity in languages, religions, economics, and governments. Course designed to remove high school deficiency only. As required.
  
  •  

    GEOG 1030♦ - Cultural Geography

    3 credit(s)

    A survey of the spatial characteristics and value systems of cultures throughout the world. F, S
  
  •  

    GEOG 2010♦ - World Regional Geography

    3 credit(s)

    Selected world regions and topics (especially those with problems or situations of contemporary interest) are used to illustrate geographic concepts and techniques. F, S
  
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    GEOG 2990♦ - Projects in Geography

    1-3 credit(s)

    Designed for the study of special projects and/or current topics in the field of geography. As required.
  
  •  

    GEOL 1030♦ - Geology

    4 credit(s)

    The study of the composition of rocks and minerals, landscape development, earthquakes, the earth’s interior and exterior, weather and climate, the nature of mountains and their development, and the drift of the continental and ocean crusted plates. Corequisite(s): GEOL 1031 F
    3 hours lecture
  
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    GEOL 1031♦ - Geology Lab

    0 credit(s)

    The study of the composition of rocks and minerals, landscape development, earthquakes, the earth’s interior and exterior, weather and climate, the nature of mountains and their development, and the drift of the continental and ocean crusted plates. Corequisite(s): GEOL 1030 F
    3 hours laboratory
  
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    GERM 1010♦ - Elementary German I

    3 credit(s)

    An elementary course in the essentials of German, with emphasis on the four skills: listening comprehension, speaking, writing, and reading. F
  
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    GERM 1020♦ - Elementary German II

    3 credit(s)

    An elementary course in the essentials of German, with emphasis on the four skills: listening comprehension, speaking, writing, and reading. Prerequisite(s): GERM 1010 S
  
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    GERM 2010♦ - Intermediate German I

    3 credit(s)

    A continuation of German grammar with readings and exercises to increase vocabulary and contribute to mastery of idiomatic constructions. Prerequisite(s): GERM 1020 or two years of high school German F
  
  •  

    GERM 2020♦ - Intermediate German II

    3 credit(s)

    A continuation of German grammar with readings and exercises to increase vocabulary and contribute to mastery of idiomatic constructions. Prerequisite(s): GERM 2010 S
  
  •  

    HIST 1000♦ - Introduction to U.S. History

    3 credit(s)

    A courses designed for students who have not had high school U.S. History. The student must maintain a grade of C or better and will receive elective credit only. The purpose of the course is to introduce the historical process, provide exposure to methods of historical study, increase familiarity with basic information about America’s past, and provide an appreciation for the factors that have produced the American culture as we know it today.
  
  •  

    HIST 1110♦ - Survey of World Civilization I

    3 credit(s)

    Major economic, political and social developments from ancient times to 1660. Emphasis on Western Civilization. Writing emphasis course (3000 words). Prerequisite(s): Completion of Learning Support Reading and Writing if required. F, S, Su
  
  •  

    HIST 1120♦ - Survey of World Civilization II

    3 credit(s)

    A continuation of World Civilization I from 1660 to the present. Emphasis on Western Civilization. Writing emphasis course (3000 words). Prerequisite(s): Completion of Learning Support Reading and Writing if required. F, S, Su
  
  •  

    HIST 2010♦ - American History I

    3 credit(s)

    American History I - The United States to 1877. A survey of the settlement and development of the colonies, the Revolutionary period, the making of the Constitution, the diplomatic, economic and political problems of the new government, the growth of Nationalism, Jacksonian Democracy, territorial expansion, the Civil War and Reconstruction. F, S, Su
  
  •  

    HIST 2020♦ - American History II

    3 credit(s)

    American History II - The United States since 1877. A survey of the growth of the United States as an industrial and world power since Reconstruction: the industrial revolution, immigration, urbanization, rise of labor, Spanish-American War, Progressivism, World War I, Twenties, Depression and New Deal, World War II, Post-World War II era and the exercise of great power status in international affairs since World War II. F, S, Su
  
  •  

    HIST 2030♦ - Tennessee History

    3 credit(s)

    A study of the geographical background, political, social and cultural history of Tennessee from earliest times to the present. S
  
  •  

    HIST 2100♦ - Introduction to Women’s Studies

    3 credit(s)

    This course is designed to introduce the student to the interdisciplinary academic field of women’s studies. HIST 2100 seeks to explore often-omitted information about women’s culture and history. It also examines political, economic, social, psychological and health issues which influence women’s lives. Students cannot receive credit for both HIST 2100 and HUM 2100. F
  
  •  

    HIST 2200♦ - Women in Society

    3 credit(s)

    This course is designed to examine the role played by women in various societies during different historical periods, factors which have limited women’s participation in history and social scientists’ assumptions about women. Students cannot receive credit for both HIST 2200 and HUM 2200. S
  
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    HIST 2990♦ - Problems in History

    1-3 credit(s)

    In-depth study of a particular event, or issue involving reading, writing and oral discussion. As required.
  
  •  

    HITC 1000 - Introduction to Health-Related Professions

    3 credit(s)

    This course is designed for students who are interested in exploring, planning, and preparing for a career as a health care practitioner. The course presents the essential information that students need to make an informed decision about health care disciplines they would like to pursue that best matches their individual interests, skills, and abilities. Course materials and student assignments will develop the student’s awareness of the demands and expectations of health care professionals, including technical, ethical, legal, and professional competencies. F, S
  
  •  

    HITC 1051 - Professional Seminar

    2 credit(s)

    This is a capstone course culminating in fundamental and comprehensive review of the domains, subdomains and tasks for entry-level registered health information technician competencies. As part of these competencies students will continue coding practice by use of encoder/grouper. Students will take mock registration exams for self-evaluation of domains, subdomains and tasks. Students will also review guides for professional activities such as resumes, job interviews, and professional conduct. Pre/Corequisite(s): Prerequisite or corequisites: MDCD 1030, MDCD 1040 S
    4 hours laboratory/week
  
  •  

    HITC 2010♦ - Fundamentals of Health Information Management

    3 credit(s)

    This course enables the student to learn the sources of health information and its relation to health agencies. A study is made of the origin and purpose, content, assembly, analysis and use of medical records. The student will learn methods of compilation, numbering, filing and retention of health information. This course is for Health Information Technology and Medical Coding majors; others must have permission of instructor. F
  
  •  

    HITC 2020♦ - Applications in Healthcare Information Systems

    3 credit(s)

    This course provides an overview of the use of automated information systems in the healthcare delivery system and its various settings. Students will be introduced to the terminology and essential concepts of health information systems and the privacy/security issues which affect access to and the use of patient information. Prerequisite(s): INFS 1010 Corequisite(s): HITC 2021 S
    2 hours lecture / 2 hours laboratory / week
  
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    HITC 2021♦ - Applications in Healthcare Information Systems Lab

    0 credit(s)

    This course provides an overview of the use of automated information systems in the healthcare delivery system and its various settings. Students will be introduced to the terminology and essential concepts of health information systems and the privacy/security issues which affect access to and the use of patient information. Corequisite(s): HITC 2020 S
    2 hours lecture / 2 hours laboratory / week
  
  •  

    HITC 2030♦ - Quality Improvement and Assessment in Healthcare

    3 credit(s)

    This course will focus on quality improvement and assessment in a variety of healthcare settings. Emphasis will be placed on implementation of quality tools and techniques as they relate to health information department activities of acute care hospitals, hospital outpatient and emergency departments, ambulatory care settings, and other healthcare facilities. Quality improvement and assessment techniques as they relate to the medical staff will also be addressed. Prerequisite(s): HITC 2020/2021, HITC 2040, HITC 2170, MDCD 1010, MDCD 1020 Corequisite(s): HITC 2031 S
    2 hours lecture / 2 hours laboratory / week
  
  •  

    HITC 2031♦ - Quality Improvement and Assessment in Healthcare Lab

    0 credit(s)

    This course will focus on quality improvement and assessment in a variety of healthcare settings. Emphasis will be placed on implementation of quality tools and techniques as they relate to health information department activities of acute care hospitals, hospital outpatient and emergency departments, ambulatory care settings, and other healthcare facilities. Quality improvement and assessment techniques as they relate to the medical staff will also be addressed. Corequisite(s): HITC 2030 S
    2 hours lecture / 2 hours laboratory / week
  
  •  

    HITC 2040♦ - Health Statistics and Registries

    2 credit(s)

    This course focuses on the collection of health data, commonly used computations, the presentation and reporting of data. This course will recognize the sources and uses of health data in the United States. This course also includes the function and use of registries, including the Tumor Registry. Pre/Corequisite(s): Prerequisites/corequisites: MDTR 1030, HITC 2010 F
    2 hours lecture / week
  
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    HITC 2050♦ - Health Information Technology Practice I

    3 credit(s)

    This course contains clinical experiences in simulated or supervised clinical facilities. The student is given the opportunity to gain knowledge and skill in admission and discharge procedures, health and vital statistics, coding and abstracting, physician incomplete records, medical transcription supervision, tumor registry and long term care facilities. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2010, BIOL 2011, BIOL 2020, BIOL 2021, HITC 2170, HITC 2180, MDTR 1030 Pre/Corequisite(s): HITC 2040, MDCD 1010, MDCD 1020 F
    1 hour lecture - 4 hours clinical / week
  
  •  

    HITC 2060♦ - Health Information Technology Practice II

    3 credit(s)

    This course contains clinical experiences simulated or supervised in clinical facilities. The student is given the opportunity to gain knowledge and skill in release of information, utilization review, patient care evaluation procedures, supervisory duties, ambulatory care settings and psych/drug rehab settings. Increased proficiency in coding skills is also emphasized. Prerequisite(s): HITC 2050 Corequisite(s): HITC 2030/2031, MDCD 1040 S
    1 hour lecture - 4 hours clinical / week
  
  •  

    HITC 2170 - Management Functions and Health Information

    2 credit(s)

    The student is introduced to management and supervisory principles of the health information management professional in healthcare organizations by use of application exercises. Prerequisite(s): HITC 2010 Corequisite(s): HITC 2020/2021, HITC 2170, MDTR 1030 S
  
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    HITC 2180 - Legal Aspects of Health Information

    2 credit(s)

    This course emphasizes the medical record as a legal document and the effect of confidential communication laws on both the release of information and use of health information. HIPAA guidelines and regulations are taught in this course. Prerequisite(s): HITC 2010 Corequisite(s): HITC 2020/2021, HITC 2170, MDTR 1030 S
  
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    HITC 2990 - Special Problems in Health Information Technology

    1-5 credit(s)

    This course covers special problems and/or current topics in Health Information Technology.
  
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    HLTH 2010♦ - Nutrition

    3 credit(s)

    This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of nutrition with emphasis on nutritional needs and the problems that arise if these needs are not met. It explores the nutrients, their chemical and physical properties, their functions in the body, their food resources and recommended intake for optimum health. Furthermore, the course covers normal nutrition, application of normal nutrition concepts to various stages of the life cycle, clinical nutrition, nutritional assessment, practice with case studies and research of current nutritional issues. S
  
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    HLTH 2210♦ - Personal Health

    3 credit(s)

    A study of personal health problems of college men and women, mental health, communicable diseases, degenerative diseases, nutrition, and other health problems of students and their families. F in odd numbered calendar years, i.e. 2015, 2017)
  
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    HLTH 2310♦ - Safety and First Aid

    3 credit(s)

    Development of a safety attitude and understanding of individual responsibility in personal and community programs for accident prevention and control. Acquiring of knowledge and skills for the emergency care of individuals. S, Su
  
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    HMGT 1010♦ - Foundations of Hospitality

    3 credit(s)

    An introduction to the major job functions of hospitality establishments such as hotels/motels, restaurants, and private clubs. The service function of the industry will be emphasized. F/S
  
  •  

    HMGT 1070 - Hotel Operations

    3 credit(s)

    This course provides a solid instruction to every aspect of hotel management. Topics include the hotel development and opening process; the general manager’s role; financial control and information management; the front office, housekeeping, security and engineering; the food and beverage division; marketing and human resources policy. S, Su
  
  •  

    HMGT 1250♦ - Service Management

    3 credit(s)

    Discover how to plan for and manage the different types of food and beverage operations in a hotel, including coffee shops, gourmet dining rooms, room service, banquets, lounges, and entertainment/show rooms. F, S, Su
  
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    HMGT 2640♦ - Hospitality Human Resource Management

    3 credit(s)

    This is the critical area of concern for the future. Learn how to recruit and retain high-caliber employees in tomorrow’s shrinking labor pool. Understand the technical and legal challenges of hospitality human resource management. Apply the specifics of recruiting competent people, dealing with labor unions, offering benefit programs, and much more. Based on U.S. labor law, including the new Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), this course is a must for anyone in operations management. F, S
  
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    HMGT 2670♦ - Front Office Procedures

    3 credit(s)

    Features information on today’s front office computer technology, yield management, and reservation systems. Helps students understand the effects of the front office on the overall operation of a hotel and works step-by-step through the front office guest cycle. Outlines the role of front office management and discusses how guest concerns shape management strategies and procedures for front office tasks. F
  
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    HMGT 2770♦ - Hospitality Sales and Marketing

    3 credit(s)

    Covers how to plan and implement effective marketing and promotional strategies - knowledge that will be critical for the success of any property. Provides tips for increasing revenue through a variety of means, from menus to telemarketing, and describes how to handle numerous selling situations. F
  
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    HMGT 2805♦ - Convention Management and Service

    3 credit(s)

    Shows you how to increase your property’s convention and meeting business through improved marketing and better service. Learn how to address meeting planners’ needs and concerns confidently, creatively, and effectively. Take advantage of unique ideas for servicing groups during their stay. S
  
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    HMGT 2910♦ - Hotel/Restaurant Internship

    1-3 credit(s)

    This course is designed to give the student practical experience in the area of hospitality management by participating in a cooperative work-study program within the hospitality industry. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor required F, S, Su
  
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    HRPR 1000 - Introduction to Health-Related Professions

    3 credit(s)

    Introduction to Health-Related Professions will encompass an overview of computer technology and the relevance to healthcare; familiarization of the various health-related professions, employment, salary issues, and compliance with federal, state, and local laws pertinent to healthcare issues F, S
    3 Lecture Hours
  
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    HUM 1030♦ - Introduction to Film Appreciation

    3 credit(s)

    A general education course that provides and introduction to film as an art form. Emphasis will be given to understanding the nature of film and its place in culture. Content includes the history and theory of film.
  
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    HUM 2010♦ - Humanities: The Human Adventure I

    3 credit(s)

    This introductory course will relate to the human experience as expressed through music, literature, art, theatre, and other disciplines from the Paleolithic Age through the 16th century. The multimedia humanities survey blends sights, sounds, impressions, and ideas that teach students both history and elements of each art form. Various topics will be considered such as freedom and responsibility, creation and destruction, order and chaos. F, Su
  
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    HUM 2020♦ - Introduction to African-American Studies I

    3 credit(s)

    Multidisciplinary approach to the Afro-American experience through the Civil War and Reconstruction years. Writing emphasis course with at least one in-class essay examination and at least 3000 words of writing outside the classroom. Equivalent to SOCI 2005
  
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    HUM 2030♦ - Introduction to African-American Studies II

    3 credit(s)

    Multidisciplinary approach to the Afro-American experience from the Civil War through the Civil Rights era; explores rural and urban society, the A-A church, and intellectual and protest movements. Writing emphasis course with at least one in-class essay examination and at least 3000 words of writing outside the classroom. Equivalent to SOCI 2006
  
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    HUM 2100♦ - Introduction to Women’s Studies

    3 credit(s)

    This course is designed to introduce the student to the interdisciplinary academic field of women’s studies. HUM 2100 seeks to explore often-omitted information about women’s culture and history. It also examines political, economic, social, psychological and health issues which influence women’s lives. Students cannot receive credit for both HUM 2100 and HIST 2100. F
  
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    HUM 2110♦ - Humanities: The Human Adventure II

    3 credit(s)

    This introductory course will explore the human experience as expressed through music, literature, art, theatre, and other disciplines from the 17th century to the present. The multimedia humanities survey blends sights, sounds, impressions, and ideas that teach students both history and elements of each art form. Various topics will be considered such as freedom and responsibility, creation and destruction, order and chaos. S, Su
  
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    HUM 2150♦ - Women in Literature

    3 credit(s)

    Introduction to the study of women through the roles and stereotypes portrayed in a variety of literary genres. Writing emphasis course with at least one in-class essay examination and at least 3000 words of writing outside the classroom.
  
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    HUM 2200♦ - Women in Society

    3 credit(s)

    This course is designed to examine the role played by women in various societies during different historical periods, factors which have limited women’s participation in history and social scientists’ assumptions about women. Students cannot receive credit for both HUM 2200 and HIST 2200. S
  
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    HUM 2500♦ - Introduction to the Great Books

    3 credit(s)

    Reading and discussion of those selections included in the Adult Great Books Program. Emphasis will be given to the understanding and interpretation of these writings through student discussions directed by a lead faculty member. Discussion leaders will also include faculty from different departments.
  
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    HUM 2900♦ - Problems and Topics in Cultural Studies

    1-6 credit(s)

    Instructor-designed courses to fulfill general humanities objectives and/or to provide specific Interdisciplinary Studies courses not offered. Provides for the advanced, individualized study of special interests in cultural studies; may include foreign and/or independent study, and may be repeated, provided the same experience is not repeated. Equivalent to SOCI 2900 and POLS 2900
  
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    HUM 2990♦ - Special Problems in the Humanities

    1-3 credit(s)

    A course featuring an examination of a topical issue (theme or value) through the humanities. This course may be repeated for credit provided the theme is not repeated.
  
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    INFS 1010♦ - Computer Applications

    3 credit(s)

    This course is designed to assist the student in achieving proficiency in computer applications. The student will demonstrate a working knowledge of word processing, electronic spreadsheets, electronic communication and on-line data bases. F, S, Su
  
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    INTC 1050/1051♦ - Computer Graphics/Animation

    3 credit(s)

    This course covers knowledge and skills of using computer graphic devices and software packages. As needed.
    2 hours lecture / 2 hours laboratory
  
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    INTC 1060/1061♦ - Web Design and Development

    3 credit(s)

    Training includes design, image manipulation, hypertext language, hyperlinks, image maps, graphic images, tables, frames, forms, Cascading Style sheets, multimedia, Web editors, and JavaScript. Prerequisite(s): INFS 1010 or equivalent F
    2 hours lecture / 2 hours laboratory
  
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    INTC 1070/1071♦ - Authoring Multimedia

    3 credit(s)

    This course provides the basic knowledge and skills to create interactive Web applications and multimedia applications and projects using current technology. Prerequisite(s): INFS 1010 or equivalent As required
    2 hours lecture / 2 hours laboratory
  
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    INTC 1085♦ - PC Set-up and Maintenance

    4 credit(s)

    Hardware and Software provide a comprehensive overview of computer hardware and software and an introduction to advanced concepts in computing. Topics include the internal components of a computer, installing an operating system, troubleshooting using system tools and diagnostic software, connecting to the Network, implementing security best practices on a workstation, peripheral setup and troubleshooting, and introduction to virtualization. This course integrates virtual learning tools to supplement classroom learning and provide an interactive “hands-on” experience. Upon successfully completing this course, the student will be academically prepared for the current A+ certification exams (both hardware and software). As required.
  
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    INTC 1090/1091♦ - Advanced Web Design and Development

    3 credit(s)

    This course provides an introduction to client- side vs. server-side environments. Database and scripting language(s) will be explored in relation to Web design, along with emerging technologies. Prerequisite(s): INTC 1060 or knowledge of HTML S
    2 hours lecture / 2 hours laboratory
  
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    INTC 2000/2001♦ - Java

    4 credit(s)

    This course will provide students with necessary knowledge and skills of programming using Java. Prerequisite(s): CISP 1230 OR INTC 1060 or some programming experience As required
    3 hours lecture / 2 hours laboratory
 

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